Solved

win 2003 server install and AD and DNS config

Posted on 2008-10-01
2
257 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-18
Hello,

I have installed win 2003 std server now going to upgrage as domain controller by DCPROMO - but i found some documentation which shows manual dns names and dns zone creation and then after go to dcpromo - i want to know which one is the easiest mathod to do the things - just a normal domain controller with few user authentication and dns services plus file sharing - no big setup environment

thanks

techsysnet
0
Comment
Question by:techsysnet
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
2 Comments
 
LVL 70

Accepted Solution

by:
KCTS earned 500 total points
ID: 22613526
Assuming you are using AD Integrated DNS its far easier to point the new Machine athe the exicting DNS server initially, DCPROMO it, then install DNS, then point it to itself for DNS

Install Windows 2003 on the new machine
Assign the new computer an IP address and subnet mask on the existing network

Make sure that the preferred DNS server on new machine points to the existing DNS Server on the Domain (normally the existing domain controller)

Join the new machine to the existing domain as a member server

If the new Windows 2003 server is the R2 version and the existing set-up is not then you need to run Adprep  from CD2 of the R2 disks on the existing Domain controller. Adprep is in the \CMPNENTS\R2\ folder on CD2
you need to run

adprep /forestprep
and
adprep /domainprep

From the command line promote the new machine to a domain controller with the DCPROMO command from the command line Select Additional Domain Controller in an existing Domain

Once Active Directory is installed then install DNS. You can do this through Add/Remove Programs->Windows Components->Networking Services->DNS.  If you are using Active Directory Integrated DNS then DNS will br replicated from the other DC/DNS.

Next make the new machine a global catalog server, go to Administrative Tools, Active Directory Sites and Services, Expand, Sites, Default first site and Servers. Right click on the new server and select properties and tick the Global Catalog checkbox. (Global catalog is essential for logon as it needs to be queried to establish Universal Group Membership)

If necessary install DHCP on the new DC. You can do this through Add/Remove Programs->Windows Components->Networking Services->DHCP.

You will then need to remove any existiing DHCP prior to authorising the new DHCP Server. When setting up the new DHCP server dont forget to set the default gateway (router) and DNS Servers. Talking of which all the clients (and the domain controllers themselves) need to have their Preferred DNS server set the new domain controller.

Both Domain Controllers by this point will have Active Directory, Global Catalog, DNS and the domain could function for a while at least should any one of them fail.


If you really want rid of the old DC then:-

Transfer all the FSMO roles to the new DC: See http://www.petri.co.il/transferring_fsmo_roles.htm

Check that you have:-
Made the other DC a global catalog:
Installed DHCP on the new DC, set up the scope and authorise it. (If using DHCP)
Make sure that all clients use the new DC as their Preferred DNS server (either by static or DHCP options)

Power down to old DC and make sure that all is well, once satisfied power on the old DC again, then run DCPROMO for remove it's domain controller status. This is essential to avoid replication errors

If you want to remove the machine from the domain then you can do so one it's DC role has been removed
0
 

Author Comment

by:techsysnet
ID: 22868269
than ks
0

Featured Post

U.S. Department of Agriculture and Acronis Access

With the new era of mobile computing, smartphones and tablets, wireless communications and cloud services, the USDA sought to take advantage of a mobilized workforce and the blurring lines between personal and corporate computing resources.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Organizations create, modify, and maintain huge amounts of data to help their businesses earn money and generally function.  Typically every network user within an organization has a bit of disk space to store in process items and personal files.   …
I've always wanted to allow a user to have a printer no matter where they login. The steps below will show you how to achieve just that. In this Article I'll show how to deploy printers automatically with group policy and then using security fil…
Monitoring a network: how to monitor network services and why? Michael Kulchisky, MCSE, MCSA, MCP, VTSP, VSP, CCSP outlines the philosophy behind service monitoring and why a handshake validation is critical in network monitoring. Software utilized …
If you’ve ever visited a web page and noticed a cool font that you really liked the look of, but couldn’t figure out which font it was so that you could use it for your own work, then this video is for you! In this Micro Tutorial, you'll learn yo…

734 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question