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What is "Resource Record" in DNS Server?

Posted on 2008-10-01
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
Hi,

1. I am still confused with the "Resource Record" in the DNS Server
2. My questions: i) What is the FUNCTION of this "RESOURCE RECORD?" (Please explain it withYour own WORDINGS firstly and give some links if necessary), ii) If you give the example, it will be great, iii) Are there any thing else that i have to know related to this resource records in DNS server?
3. Thank you

Tjie
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Question by:tjie
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by:Justin Durrant
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deroyer earned 200 total points
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A resource record is very genericly a record in DNS...  There are many different types of resource records and a quick google search will explain each of them in a little bit more detail.  

DNS, in layman's terms, is what (for lack of a better term) correlates a machines network address (IP Address) into  a human readable computer name.  Example: Sorry I am a teacher I must elaborate this...
If you think of real estate your house is on county plot say (1eh-407) and your street address is 123 main street.  Think of the IP address of the computer as the county plot code and the street address as the DNS name of that computer.

The most common Resource records in DNS are A record (this actually point to IP address to the machine name), CName record (this is used to create an alias for an A record), MX Record (used for identifying Mail servers on a network)
For more detail see... http://www.zytrax.com/books/dns/ch8/

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by:xperttech
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A DNS server can provide way more information than just reverse lookups and name resolution. This link provides a deeper look at DNS services and Resource Records that can be hosted in a DNS server:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/iseries/v5r3/index.jsp?topic=/rzakk/rzakkconceptresourcerec.htm
 
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by:KCTS
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I'll put it simply

An resource record (also called an "A" record), maps a hostname to an IP adddress.

When a DNS client wants to find an IP address, DNS looks throuht the host records for the name specified and returns the IP address.
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