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Recommendations on Designing a Photography Studio for Business

We are going to make a new catalog for our company. We'll take thousands of photos and want to make sure they all look professional. I have an 8.1 megapixel camera and am fairly savvy at Photoshop.

I want to make sure before we edit backgrounds, that the lighting is good. I've found a couple of places on the internet to educate me a little but I would really like a professional to give me some quality recommendations on how they would set it up. We'll be shooting industrial products.

Here's some of the places I've found helpful or at least interesting:


Thanks for any help you can provide!!
1 Solution
Andres PeralesCommented:
Another resource for you to look at is http://www.dpreview.com in the forums there is a lighting form, great place.

Here's some thoughts for you. First of all, will you be taking your equipment to the products, or will they be coming to the studio? How big are they? How much do they vary in size?

With modern digital cameras, where you can set a custom white balance,  sometimes issues which used to be critical now are much less so. For example, I know a photographer who shoots cars for online auctions. His studio is simply a drywalled and painted 3-car garage, with a lot of extra fluorescent lighting built into the ceiling. He uses a couple of extra flashes for interiors. His work is great, and his workflow is very simple - drive a freshly detailed car into the garage, take a set sequence of photos, move the portable flashes into place for the interiors, shoot, drive the car out. An assistant takes the CF card and checks the images while the next car is driven in. You can process a lot of {cars|products|whathaveyou} in a day with a workflow like that.

As far as equipment is concerned, what you buy will be driven by your workflow, so think about that before you make purchases. If you need to photograph large industrial equipment outdoors, you'll need battery-powered portable equipment. If you plan to shoot everything indoors or within reach of an extension cord, you can spend much less money on studio equipment. Maybe you need both, if the range of items is broad enough.


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