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Why can't I connect to my VMware ESX server using FTP?

Posted on 2008-10-01
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
I've connected to the ESX 3.5 server using VMware Infrastructure Client (VIC), and went to Configuration->Security Profile->Properties and enabled the FTP server port.

I then try to login using my handy FTP software tool "SmartFTP", by entering in the IP Address, the user name (root), my password, and the default FTP port of 21.  I then receive the error message of "No connection could be made because the target machine actively refused it."

Is there an additional permissions that needs to be enabled on the ESX server, or something else that needs to be done so that I can connect via FTP?

Thanks!
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Question by:RTCexpert
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7 Comments
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:mgonullu
ID: 22619215
Is there any firewall running on the machine hosting your ESX?
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:BogdanSUA
ID: 22619701
You cannot use root's credentials.  You need to create another user and ftp as the other user.

Alternatively you could try Veeam Fast SCP.
http://www.veeam.com/vmware-esx-fastscp.html
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Author Comment

by:RTCexpert
ID: 22623314
By default ESX 3.5 has a firewall enabled, but I enabled FTP to pass through.

I run into the same issue with Veeam Fast SCP, which is I can't connect do to "No connection could be made".  I believe that I would also need to use a different user for this to work, other than the root user as well (I did enable Fast SCP, per their website instructions, to be able to get through the default ESX firewall).

It's been about 12 years since I've done anything with Linux or UNIX.

Is there some simple instructions on creating a new user account and granting it the permissions it requires for me to FTP and transfer files to the Linux based ESX 3.5 server?

Thanks!
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LVL 7

Accepted Solution

by:
BogdanSUA earned 500 total points
ID: 22623713
Before I give you a crash course on adduer, passwd, chown, and chmod, do you know you can upload/download files to the ESX vmfs datastores via the VIC?

Begin crash course:
To create a new user issue the following commands from the service console:

adduser jdoe

Then give the user a password with this command
passwd jdoe


Granting permission/ownership is a little tricky.  You can grant permission directly to the user or to a group that the user belongs to.

To grant ownership to a user chown jdoe:root foo.txt
To grant ownership to a group chown root:users foo.txt

Then you got your permissions part which is done with chmod.  The highest permision is 777, which you should not use, but i'm telling you about it in order to explain something.

The first 7 is a user permission....but why 7? 4 + 2 + 1 = 7.  A 4 means read permission.  A 2 means write permission.  A 1 means execute permission.  So if you want read, write, execute, then its a 7.  If you want read and write its a 6.  If you want read and execute, its a 5....etc.

The second 7 is a group permission.  Use the same math logic from above.  If you want no permission for the group just use a zero for the middle digit.

The last 7 is for everyone else.  If you want to give no permission to everyone else just use a zero for the last digit.

So 777 is the highest permission, and should be used rarely if ever.

So if you type chmod 770 foo.txt your'e giving user and group who owns it full access to the file.
If you chmod 660 foo.txt you're giving read/write access to the user n group.

I hope this is making sense.  Otherwise let me know specifically what you're trying to accomplish and why and I can point you in the right direction.
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Author Comment

by:RTCexpert
ID: 22624157
I would just use the the VIC to upload the files, but I want to be able to change to one of the higher level directories.

I'm not sure if there is any type of any issue with adding an additional folder within vmfs3 area used for the virtual machines, since the files I want to upload are ISO images to do installs?

If the above is not an issue, then I should not have to do the FTP and will just create a new folder within the vmfs3 area for the ISO files I have.

Thanks a lot for your help!

Peter
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:BogdanSUA
ID: 22629283
There is no issue with creating a temporary holding folder on your VMFS volume.  You can drop your data in there via the VIC, and then use the "mv" command to move it to a different directory.

Example: mv foo.txt /home/bogdan/
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Author Closing Comment

by:RTCexpert
ID: 31502159
Thanks for your help!  We ended up using another solution to get around this FTP issue.
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