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Explain: why certain operators cannot be overloaded

Posted on 2008-10-01
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Last Modified: 2010-10-05
.
.*
::
?:
#
##

the above c++ operators i know, cannot be overloaded. I am looking for an explanation behind this reasoning.
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Question by:vaavoom
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sunnycoder earned 500 total points
ID: 22621762
Hello vaavoom,

From Stroustrup himself
www.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq2.html


Most operators can be overloaded by a programmer. The exceptions are

      . (dot)  ::  ?:  sizeof

There is no fundamental reason to disallow overloading of ?:. I just didn't see the need to introduce the special case of overloading a ternary operator. Note that a function overloading expr1?expr2:expr3 would not be able to guarantee that only one of expr2 and expr3 was executed.

Sizeof cannot be overloaded because built-in operations, such as incrementing a pointer into an array implicitly depends on it. Consider:

      X a[10];
      X* p = &a[3];
      X* q = &a[3];
      p++;      // p points to a[4]
            // thus the integer value of p must be
            // sizeof(X) larger than the integer value of q

Thus, sizeof(X) could not be given a new and different meaning by the programmer without violating basic language rules.

In N::m neither N nor m are expressions with values; N and m are names known to the compiler and :: performs a (compile time) scope resolution rather than an expression evaluation. One could imagine allowing overloading of x::y where x is an object rather than a namespace or a class, but that would - contrary to first appearances - involve introducing new syntax (to allow expr::expr). It is not obvious what benefits such a complication would bring.

Operator . (dot) could in principle be overloaded using the same technique as used for ->. However, doing so can lead to questions about whether an operation is meant for the object overloading . or an object referred to by . For example:

      class Y {
      public:
            void f();
            // ...
      };

      class X {      // assume that you can overload .
            Y* p;
            Y& operator.() { return *p; }
            void f();
            // ...
      };

      void g(X& x)
      {
            x.f();      // X::f or Y::f or error?
      }

This problem can be solved in several ways. At the time of standardization, it was not obvious which way would be best.



Regards,
sunnycoder
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