Solved

Installation of MDE and MDB in Vista

Posted on 2008-10-02
4
548 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-05
Hi everyone,

We use the Microsoft Access Developers toolkit for Access 2003 to create an installer for our access application.

The installer installs the two database files required to run, they are an MDE and an MDB.

They get installed to C:\Program Files\Our Application\

On Windows XP this is totally fine but on Vista it creates a copy of the database files each time we run which causes lots of issues because C:\Program Files on Vista is read only.

Where would be the best place to install the application on Vista. Or could we programmatically make our folder in Program Files Read/Write enabled.

Also, how could we detect that Vista is the operating system in Access VBA????
0
Comment
Question by:Milks
  • 2
4 Comments
 
LVL 54

Expert Comment

by:McKnife
ID: 22629411
"C:\Program Files on Vista is read only" - no, it ain't. But without the so called elevation, you cannot write into %program files% even when running as administrator. So elevate or alter the ntfs rights to users: modify.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Milks
ID: 22629536
Mcknife please explain what you mean by ekevate or alter NTFS rights.

Could you provide me with a documentation, or user guide on how to change this??
0
 
LVL 54

Accepted Solution

by:
McKnife earned 500 total points
ID: 22629599
To elevate a program, rightclick its executable and select "run as administrator". [setups usually self-elevate, you see the "grey curtain" togther with the dialog "windows needs your permission to continue" - that's elevation].
NTFS-permissions can be altered by rightclicking the file/folder and selecting properties - security. The users group will need modify rights on that subfolder of c:\progfiles, I suppose.
There are commandline tools for both tasks. For elevation, see here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc162321.aspx, for NTFS permissions: use icacls.exe (belongs to any vista installation).
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Path Explorer

An intuitive utility to help find the CSS path to UI elements on a webpage. These paths are used frequently in a variety of front-end development and QA automation tasks.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

I see at least one EE question a week that pertains to using temporary tables in MS Access.  But surprisingly, I was unable to find a single article devoted solely to this topic. I don’t intend to describe all of the uses of temporary tables in t…
A simple tool to export all objects of two Access files as text and compare it with Meld, a free diff tool.
Familiarize people with the process of retrieving data from SQL Server using an Access pass-thru query. Microsoft Access is a very powerful client/server development tool. One of the ways that you can retrieve data from a SQL Server is by using a pa…
In Microsoft Access, learn the trick to repeating sub-report headings at the top of each page. The problem with sub-reports and headings: Add a dummy group to the sub report using the expression =1: Set the “Repeat Section” property of the dummy…

808 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question