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Unable to assign permission on "File System" directory

Posted on 2008-10-03
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I am unable to assign permission to anyone on "File System" Directory in My Computer even after logging with Root Account. I get an error message "The permission cannot be changed. Sorry, cou;dn't change the permission of "Filesystem".
As per the screenshot, i am trying to assign permission of "Read and Write" access to "Others"
Everything works fine on other directories as well as new directory/folder that i create.

Please check the screenshot for more details
Linux-file-permission.jpg
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Question by:Hardeep_Saluja
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StrongBad_Rules earned 1200 total points
ID: 22639690
edit your /etc/fstab file to set the permissions,

try something like this:

#DEVICE MOUNT POINT FILE SYSTEM PERMISSIONS
/dev/hda2 /mnt/winc vfat rw,exec,uid=1000,gid=1000,auto 0 0


"uid" and "gid" tags tell to Linux which owner (user and group) to set, you must change them to user and owner id that you prefer, to discover gid and your uid of any user do this:

id user_name


if you omit "user_name" your uid and gid will be returned, surely you will have many gid, don't worry about this!

"auto" option means that the filesystem is mounted on boot.

you can learn more typing

man fstab
man mount
man id
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Expert Comment

by:Tintin
ID: 22639737
It appears the directory you are trying to change is possibly a NFS mounted directory.
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Assisted Solution

by:pepecura
pepecura earned 300 total points
ID: 22641850
It seems that it is a SELinux issue. I am not experienced on SELinux but the following link may help you. The file_t part seems relevant to your problem.  

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/SELinux/Troubleshooting/AVCDecisions

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