?
Solved

Access Point selection

Posted on 2008-10-04
5
Medium Priority
?
297 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-09
I am creating a small,  yet true and fully functional (as in assignment of external IP's in a class C block), highspeed WISP for a condo community which will serve roughly 100-150 residences and we would like to do it completely wirelessly.  Aside from the Indoor Cisco 1252, are there any other AP's that transmit IAW 802.11n?  The best solution would be outdoor 802.11n AP's because the tenants actually own the inside of the units and there are no hallways or HOA owned property connecting the inside of the units.  If there are no outdoor varients, could an indoor AP be used outdoors effectively (specifically the Cisco 1252 or some variant)?  Also, if not 802.11n, what are some options for highspeed 802.11x variants with low latency?  Finally, aside from WDS and a mesh, are there any other setups that will allow dynamic routing across the AP's?  IE, if the user wants to walk somewhere on the property and roam between the AP's without losing connection.  I've read that mesh and WDS kill the effective bandwidth--presumably due to the hops to get back to the base.

Note: the core setup for the WISP are two DS3's at 25/mbits with BGP redundancy, a cisco 7200 mxr router, and RADIUS server for authentication.

Very Respectfully,
Phillip
0
Comment
Question by:veloxLLC
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 3
  • 2
5 Comments
 
LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:Darr247
ID: 22640917
The Cisco Aironet 1510AG is outdoor rated and dual band... in mesh mode they use the 5GHz radio to communicate with other 1510's, and the 2.4GHz radio for client connections, providing maximum bandwidth.
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/wireless/ps5679/ps6548/product_data_sheet0900aecd803642e6.html is the info page for them... as it shows, AIR-LAP1510AG-A-K9 is the FCC-configured model, and they have many antenna and mounting options listed there as well.

*Probably* those will be upgradable to 802.11n when that standard is ratified, but that's still over a year away.
0
 

Author Comment

by:veloxLLC
ID: 22642171
As far as using the Cisco 1252 outdoors, is there a viable solution for that?  

Also, as stated before "Finally, aside from WDS and a mesh, are there any other setups that will allow dynamic routing across the AP's?  IE, if the user wants to walk somewhere on the property and roam between the AP's without losing connection.  I've read that mesh and WDS kill the effective bandwidth--presumably due to the hops to get back to the base."

Is there much of a degredation in perceived speed when using a mesh like there is in WDS?
0
 

Author Comment

by:veloxLLC
ID: 22642185
Also, as far as the .11g is concerned, how are some radios achieving a theoretical max of 108mbps?
0
 
LVL 44

Accepted Solution

by:
Darr247 earned 2000 total points
ID: 22642552
> As far as using the Cisco 1252 outdoors, is there a viable solution for that?  

It usually costs more to buy a NEMA-4x enclosure for a device than it does to buy the device in its weatherproofed version.


> I've read that mesh and WDS kill the effective bandwidth--presumably due to the hops to get back to the base."

As I said, the 1510's prevent the bandwidth loss you describe by using the 5GHz radios to talk to each other and 2.4GHz radios to talk to the clients.


> Is there much of a degredation in perceived speed when using a mesh like there is in WDS?

If done correctly there is no loss of speed when using a WDS Bridge. The reason ''repeaters'' cut bandwidth is because they have to spend half their time talking to the other bridge and half the time talking to the client-side... but if the WDS Bridge is connected 'back-to-back' with another AP, that eliminates the repeater step (rather like the Cisco AP's do by using one radio as the bridge and the other radio as the AP).  I've seen some people say each hop cuts bandwidth in half AGAIN, but that's not quite correct as I see it - each hop is running at half its maximum throughput, but once each hop is done transferring its data it's removed from the 'equation'.
Most setups don't have multiple T3's as you describe, either (each T3/DS3 should give about 45Mbps, btw... you might want to double-check with your provider what it is you're actually getting), but even halved by repeaters/bridges and then split by multiple users, few people ever experience a connection that fast. Even a true 10Mbps web connection is rare; cable connections typically top out at 6Mbps; a T1 line is just under 1.5Mbps, of course, and is plenty fast for streaming video.


> Also, as far as the .11g is concerned, how are some radios achieving a theoretical max of 108mbps?

Well, Frame Bursting works with any chipset, but both sides need to have it enabled (and it doesn't change the reported connection speed). That works by chaining packets together without adding headers to each packet, reducing overhead (not unlike Jumbo packets with gigabit ethernet, just not as big).
Atheros chipsets implement SuperG and Turbo, report 108Mbps connection speeds, and actually do double the maximum throughput to about 60Mbps.
Broadcom calls their technology 'Afterburner' and 'Turbo-G', and since Linksys uses Broadcom chipsets in most of their stuff, that is what's behind their 'Speedbooster' models.  'Turbo' does not equal 'Turbo-G', and neither of them talk any faster to the other chipset's radios (except in Frame Burst mode). And from the tests I've seen Atheros to Atheros is faster than Broadcom to Broadcom (and as far as I know there aren't any Broadcom-chipset MiniPCI cards, anyway).

IMHO, the Atheros Super-G is a 'good thing' for 11a, but not 11g. It uses the same technology 11n uses for higher speeds - a 40MHz-wide channel, which essentially overlaps 10 of the 11 channels available in the americas for 11b/g devices (e.g. channel 1 and 6 together would make a double-speed 40MHz-wide channel, leaving only channel 11 for nearby 11g devices to use interference-free). There are eight to twelve non-overlapping 20MHz-wide 11a channels available in the 5GHz band, meaning you could have four to six 40MHz-wide channels instead of just one, as the 2.4GHz band (having only three non-overlapping 20MHz-wide channels) has room for.
0
 

Author Comment

by:veloxLLC
ID: 22642591
the DS3's are a minimum commit of 25mbits, with a burstable speed of 45.  So basically we have the equiv of 1 full DS3 with redundancy.
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: IP Lookup

Get more info about an IP address or domain name, such as organization, abuse contacts and geolocation.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

This article describes how to perform a hard reset on your router. Usually this is most-useful on wireless routers, but the same concept applies to nearly all home/SOHO routers. This process will return the router to factory defaults, so record your…
DECT technology has become a popular standard for wireless voice communication. DECT devices are not likely to be affected by other electronic devices and signals because they operate in a separate frequency-band.
NetCrunch network monitor is a highly extensive platform for network monitoring and alert generation. In this video you'll see a live demo of NetCrunch with most notable features explained in a walk-through manner. You'll also get to know the philos…
In this brief tutorial Pawel from AdRem Software explains how you can quickly find out which services are running on your network, or what are the IP addresses of servers responsible for each service. Software used is freeware NetCrunch Tools (https…
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month12 days, 13 hours left to enroll

777 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question