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How do I convert a Java date/time into UTC coordinates ?

How do I convert a Java date/time into UTC coordinates in this format: 2008-09-24T15:57:57.2Z
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cindymccartney
Asked:
cindymccartney
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2 Solutions
 
wwnosalCommented:
You can do the following trick ;-)
Calendar c = Calendar.getInstance();   
    SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");
    SimpleDateFormat stf = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm:ss");
    double offset  = c.getTimeZone ( ).getRawOffset ( )/(1000*60*60);
    DecimalFormat NF = new DecimalFormat("###.##");    
    System.out.println (sdf.format ( c.getTime ( ) ) +"T"+ stf.format ( c.getTime ()) +"." +NF.format ( offset )  +"Z");
    

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cindymccartneyAuthor Commented:
I tried your solution, and came out with the following result:  2008-10-07T12:52:52.-8Z

Should I be getting a negative number there?
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Kevin CrossChief Technology OfficerCommented:
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Kevin CrossChief Technology OfficerCommented:
Try this:
Calendar today = Calendar.getInstance();
      SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'hh:mm:ss.S'Z'");
      sdf.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT+0"));
      
      System.out.println(sdf.format(today.getTime()));

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cindymccartneyAuthor Commented:
I am not sure what the value prior to the "Z" is supposed to be here for UTC.  Is it simply the first character of the milli-seconds, or does it mean something else.  From the examples that I am seeing, it changes, so it can't just be a default offset.

mwvisa1, your code displays three value milli-seconds and does not fit the format.

I am still unable to display the following format: 2008-09-24T15:57:57.2Z
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Kevin CrossChief Technology OfficerCommented:
I was going on fact that you didn't want the offset shown and that you had 15 hours, 57 minutes, 57 seconds, and 2 milliseconds.  If that is meant to be something different, then please explain what you are looking for there.  In the other examples they are using Z in formating which will return the offset to Zulu.  I put in literal 'Z' since you didn't want to see the -04:00 which is what I see on my system being EDT.

If the two is also a literal instead of actual milliseconds just do this:
Calendar today = Calendar.getInstance();
      SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'hh:mm:ss.'2Z'");
      sdf.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT+0"));
      
      System.out.println(sdf.format(today.getTime()));

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cindymccartneyAuthor Commented:
Well, the problem is I really don't know what the value is prior to the "Z".  I was only given a specification without a description.  So I don't know if it's an offset or not.  What I do know is that the value changes.  I have seen examples of a "2Z" as well a "5Z".  Would there ever be a positive offset like that, or would that have to be the first character of the milli-seconds?  I know it can't be a static literal.
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Kevin CrossChief Technology OfficerCommented:
There are positive offsets for timezones that are GMT+1 for Amsterdam or Berlin.  However, this is usually noted like this:

2008-09-24T15:57:57+0100
OR
2008-09-24T15:57:57-0400

I believe the 2 is your number of milliseconds but they are using the S option versus SSS.  What this means is if you only have 2 milliseconds you will see .2 versus .002; therefore, the number of digits between final . and Z can vary from 1-3.

http:#22666128

I would go with format in linked suggestion versus hardcoded; however, if you want offset there instead just remove the ' from around Z.

yyyy-MM-dd'T'hh:mm:ss.Z
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cindymccartneyAuthor Commented:
I tried your suggestion in link #22666128,  however that displayed 3 milli-second characters, not just the one.  Your logic seems correct having the single 'S' in the format, but I assume something in the next two lines is overriding the single milli-second and displaying all three:

sdf.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT+0"));
System.out.println(sdf.format(today.getTime()));
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Kevin CrossChief Technology OfficerCommented:
the S means if the milli-seconds are single digit like say 2 milli-seconds, you will only get 2 instead of 002.  It does NOT mean that if you have 502 milli-seconds that you will only see 5.

If you time it right you can see what I am talking about...I just think the examples you were given were right at beginning of a second and so have single digits; however, I may be wrong.

Just don't want you chasing something for no reason.

Regards,
Kevin
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cindymccartneyAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your help!
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