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RWW, Firefox 3.0.1, MAC OSX 10.4.11 ActiveX Issue

Posted on 2008-10-06
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Last Modified: 2013-12-07
Hello,

I am receiving the following message when trying to connect to a client dekstop when using the latest verson of Firefox and RWW:

This portion of the Remote Web Workplace requires the Microsoft Remote Desktop ActiveX Control. Your browser's security settings may be preventing you from downloading ActiveX controls. Adjust these settings, and try to connect again.

I dowloaded a program called IE tab, which allowed me to get further than without, but I was unable to install/find the necessary plugin to make that work.

I am not sure if it is an issue of using MAC OS Tiger, but I believe that I should be able to connect.  I cannot find the appropriate ActiveX settings within Firefox to overcome the error message above.  I am by no means a computer expert, so please "dumb it down" for me if possible.

Your assistance is greatly appreciated!!

Sincerely,

CharlieB
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Question by:CharlieB60
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12 Comments
 
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jhyiesla earned 84 total points
ID: 22656060
Firefox basically doesn't support Active-X. Having said that, as you have discovered that's not totally true, but for the most part it is.
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Assisted Solution

by:Eoin OSullivan
Eoin OSullivan earned 83 total points
ID: 22657362
As jhyiesla says .. Firefox doesn't support ActiveX .. in fact it is the entire OSX that doesn't support ActiveX!!

The error message that is displayed in Firefox is a little misleading as it implies that it is just a small security issue preventing you from viewing the ActiveX component

You CANNOT run any website that requires ActiveX on any OSX browser.

To view ActiveX-enabled websites on a Mac you'll need to install a copy of WindowsXP in a virtual OS* using a program like Parallels ($79 - http://www.parallels.com) or Sun VirtualBox (FREE - http://www.virtualbox.org/).  Then you can run Windows and Internet Explorer and ActiveX

* You will require an Intel Mac to run these virtual OS applications.

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LVL 53

Assisted Solution

by:strung
strung earned 83 total points
ID: 22665231
A cheaper solution is CrossOver for Mac:  http://www.codeweavers.com/products/cxmac/ which will allow you to run the Windows version of Internet Explorer 6 with Activex on an Intel Mac without installing Windows.

I have used this quite successfully to connect to RWW.
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Expert Comment

by:strung
ID: 22665242
There is also a similar freeware program, Darwine, but I have never tried it:  http://darwine.sourceforge.net/
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Expert Comment

by:Eoin OSullivan
ID: 22666780
The problem with Darwine is that it doesn't support ActiveX controls as I've tried it on OSX.

Crossover Mac is 1/2 the price of Parallels ($40) and DOES support ActiveX in IE

Sun VirtualBox is FREE (Windows XP license excluded) and if you can spare the time to install it then you'll have a complete Windows environment to run any Windows application on your Mac.

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Expert Comment

by:strung
ID: 22667975
The advantage to Crossover is it saves you the cost of a Windows licence, and takes up less disk space than the other solutions.
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Expert Comment

by:jhyiesla
ID: 22668299
The disadvantage to Crossover is that it is only marginally compatible with certain Windows programs. For example, I had a need for IE and was looking for a solution other than Parallels and Fusion.  I downloaded and installed Crossover and IE.  Now, for the most part it did work and it sounds like that others here have had luck with what you want to do.  The problem is that applications that make use of IE live and breathe on addons to IE.  We have a couple of applications that use IE, but have to add things to it, like Active-X, in order to function properly.  My app that needed Active-X worked OK, but some others needed to attach some other things to IE, sorry can't remember exactly what, and those did not.

So, Crossover does work, and pretty well, and it may very well solve this issue.  But if you have other Windows applications that you need to incorporate into your environment or other applications that may make use of IE in different ways, Crossover may not function.  If you're looking for a really compatible solution for running Windows apps on a Mac, you really need to look at Parallels or Fusion.
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Expert Comment

by:strung
ID: 22668458
I couldn't agree more. Crossovers has limited compatibility, but it is a relatively cheap solution to getting RWW running and doesn't take up much disk space, which can be a problem on many Mac laptops with small drives. When I replaced the original 120 Gig drive in my MacBookPro with a 320, I bought VMWare fusion and installed WinXP to use instead of Crossovers. But I was too tight for disk space to do that with the 120 Gig drive.

So it really comes down to a matter of budget. If you are tight on disk space or don't want to pay for a WInXP licence, and if your needs are limited to RWW, then Crossovers is probably a good choice. Otherwise, Parallels or VMware Fusion or VirtualBox will likely make you happier.

By the way, tne one feature of RWW remote access that did not work with Crossovers is the ability to share the local and remote drives. If that is critical, it might eliminate Crossovers.
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by:Eoin OSullivan
ID: 22668478
jhyiesla - don't forget Sun VirtualBox .. it is a FREE alternative to Parallels and VMWare Fusion and has been well received and compares favorably to the two others in terms of cost.  In terms of performance, for standard MS Office and basic usage it is capable of matching the other 2.

I've tried VirtualBox and have Parallels too and they are very similar.
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Expert Comment

by:jhyiesla
ID: 22668597
True, VirtualBox is also an alternative.  Although I know someone who's used Macs for years and he used VB for a while and decided to spend the money and go with another solution... not sure why.
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