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I want to reach the Windows drives under Linux...How can i do that?

Posted on 2008-10-08
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
I want to go to my C: drive and edit some files under Linux...
Windows is XP SP3 C:->NTFS

I want to reach the Windows drives under Linux...How can i do that?

I mean, is there a command to do that or what?

Best regards...
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Question by:jazzIIIlove
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sunnycoder earned 200 total points
ID: 22668948
Hello jazzIIIlove,

mount -t ntfs /dev/hda1 /mnt/win

http://www.reallylinux.com/docs/toptip3.shtml  -- check this first
http://gentoo-wiki.com/HOWTO_Mount_Windows_partitions_(DOS,_FAT,NTFS)  -- this one is more detailed with kernel options etc.

man mount

Regards,
sunnycoder
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by:omarfarid
omarfarid earned 120 total points
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by:Lee W, MVP
Lee W, MVP earned 20 total points
ID: 22669385
I would be cautious... I've not yet heard of a truly safe way of editing files on NTFS partitions under linux.  Reading partitions, is fine, but if you need to edit, before enabling write using whatever NTFS driver may exist, I would suggest you create a FAT partitions or use an external drive to save alternate versions of files to that you can then access from Windows.
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by:rid
rid earned 130 total points
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Well, caution is a good thing, but I have no problems with read/write access to NTFS partitions under Ubuntu; I use the function regularly with mail store for Thunderbird common to both Linux and windows (on the same machine), on the windows partition. It's been working OK for 6 months. I DO make backups regularly, just like I would have done running windows only... I do suspect that odd file name characters MIGHT be able to mess things up, or too long paths/filenames, but I haven't run into that, yet.
/RID
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by:eager
eager earned 30 total points
ID: 22679770
leew --

NTFS support for writing in Linux used to be problematic in the past, as you say.  It appears to be stable and fully functional in recent releases.  
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by:jazzIIIlove
ID: 22694560
sunnycoder:
you are right but also i want to modify the files and directories there...When i executed below, yes i can see the ntfs file system, no i cannot modify the file system under linux...
mount -t ntfs /dev/hda1 /mnt/win

Yes, this works of course after creating win directory under /mnt...But the directory system becomes readonly...You may say, recompile your kernel...Out of question...:)

from your gentoo link:
I modifies fstab...(of course not hda1 in my machine)
/dev/hda1  /mnt/ntfs  ntfs  defaults  0 0

no use...
omarfarid:
<<http://www.justlinux.com/nhf/Filesystems/Mounting_smbfs_Shares_Permanently.html

<from the link>
mount -t smbfs //servername/sharename /mountdirectory -o username=mywindowsusername,password=mywindowspassword

//servername/sharename refers to the name of the Windows computer and the name of the share.
/mountdirectory refers to the directory you use as the mount point on the Linux workstation. It can be any directory as long as the user executing the command has rights to it.

Whether you need to supply a username and password depends on what type of security you have on the Windows share. If you have a share created with no password on it, you shouldn't need to provide a username and password. If the share happens to be on a Windows NT server that is part of a domain, you would need to provide a domain login name and password.
</from the link>

ok...i got it but to execute mount -t smbfs  command, i think i need to install a samba server under my linux...and i think i need to connect to this local server as a client...Your link show this but i cannot completely understand the command...Can you give me an example?

<<http://learnlinux.tsf.org.za/courses/build/net-admin/ch08s02.html

I am new to Linux and will i have to configure smbf.conf file after the installation?

leew:
ok...i consider this..

rid and eager:
thanks for the info...
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by:rid
rid earned 130 total points
ID: 22694678
To mount a local hard drive windows partition, I don't think samba is the way to go. The suggested additions to fstab should do. However, in my case I set <type> to auto and I have the entry "users" in the <options> column, to allow ordinary users suitable access. The line is:

/dev/sda1    /mnt/windrive-c    auto     users   0  0

and that seems to work OK for me. This is an Ubuntu 8.04 system with win XP on NTFS as the other possible boot option.
/RID
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by:jazzIIIlove
ID: 22694985
to clarify the issue more,

I first installed Linux Pardus then I had partitioned the disk with GParted and then installed Microsoft Windows...
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by:omarfarid
omarfarid earned 120 total points
ID: 22695050
I don't think that you need Samba server installed on linux to be able to access the windows share. Try providing a valid username and password on the domain while connecting to the share
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