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Help addressing size issues on a RAID 1 drive with two partitions

Posted on 2008-10-08
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Last Modified: 2010-04-03
I have an SBS 2003 server with a C: and D: partition on a RAID 1 array.  They are running out of space on both partitions and we need to expand.  We added two new drives to the existing bus and created a new RAID 1 array.  The plan as laid out by Dell should be to copy the existing D: partition to the new space and make that the new D: drive.  Take the old D: drive and merge it with the C:, problem solved.  The issue we're having is in regards to the current folder permissions and other attributes not being copied over.

Any idea on how to copy the data over with all the attributes following as well?
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Question by:broadway69
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waynewilliams earned 250 total points
ID: 22673630
You can use xcopy at the command prompt with the /O switch which copies over all the NTFS permissions.

A simple example of a xcopy command would be:

xcopy D:\*.* E:\*.*  /D /O /E /F /H

To see what all the switches do you can type xcopy /? at the command prompt.

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by:cuziyq
cuziyq earned 250 total points
ID: 22673641
There are two options:

Presumably, when you create the new array, it will be drive E: or something temporarily while you copy the files over to it.  You can issue the following command from a command prompt:

XCOPY D:\*.* E:\ /S /E /H /K /O /X

This will copy over all files in all directories starting at the root of D: downwards.  The /H switch includes files with hidden and system attributes, /K copies over attributes (i.e. read-only, archive, etc.), and /O and /X copy over ACL information (permissions) and auditing settings.

Note that if you are attempting to copy files for which you do not have access to (shouldn't happen if you do it as an administrator account, but this can happen with user folders to which Administrators are not in the ACL), the copy operation will fail.  You will need to take ownership of those files, or add Administrators as authorized users.

The second option, which is the easier one, is to MOVE the files rather than COPY them.  By default, COPYING a set of files will make the new files in the new location inherit whatever permissions are set on the place they're being copied to.  MOVING those files causes Windows to copy over the ACL and owner information as well.  The drawback to this method is that there is no do-over.  If something fails to move (i.e. Admins don't have access to the file/folder), then the move will stop and you'll wind up with half the files one one drive and half on the other, and then it becomes a pain in the butt.

The first option has the advantage that, should something fail, you've still got the originals, and you can just start all over again if things get hairy.
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Expert Comment

by:chugarah
ID: 22673671
If I understand you have merged C and D to new D drive on the new harddrive?
If you have done that just try changing the letter name back to C.

Another idea is to use backup software to take the partition that needs the special folder permission and put it on new drive. For example acronis/norton or other bacup software.
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Author Comment

by:broadway69
ID: 22673687
hmmmm...

I think I will default on the side of caution for this one and use xcopy.  I'll let you know if this works!
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Expert Comment

by:SysExpert
ID: 22673853
use robocopy in the free windows resource kit for win 2003

xxcopy may also be able to do this.


I hope this helps !
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Expert Comment

by:cuziyq
ID: 22674019
Another alternative I have used in a pinch is to use WinRAR set to use no compression and then unpacking it to the target drive.  Not only will WinRAR preserve attribute and ACL information (if you tell it to), it will even go so far as to preserve the file modification and access timestamps too!  Use this option if you have to dump the D: drive you've got before you can make the new one.  It works great.
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Author Comment

by:broadway69
ID: 22675660
Thanks for all your help.  Looks like were just gonna rebuild with RAID 5
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