Solved

Want to add standalone XP Pro to a network, and not lose my settings

Posted on 2008-10-08
6
214 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-21
I'm setting up a home network with Windows Server 2008 freshly installed. My workstation is XP Pro, and I have tons of settings and other stuff installed. (I log on as Administrator) I basically want to know how to not lose all of my settings when I log onto the new network, after I'm added to it. Is it as simple as using the same logon information I'm currently using on the workstation when I add myself as a user on Windows Server 2008? Is this even a best practice, or possible?
0
Comment
Question by:sperodev
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 3
  • 2
6 Comments
 
LVL 15

Expert Comment

by:tenaj-207
ID: 22674626
I would try two things. I'd start with windows migration wizard (start run and type in migwiz) I'd save this to the root of the c: drive.  Then I'd join the PC to the domain, add your account to the local adminitrators group then reboot.  Log in with your new account and run the Migration Wizard again, this time importing all your settings.  To finish the process you'll have to log off and back in.  Everything should now be the same as when you left it.  If it's not then log back out and log in as the domain admin.  Now copy (not move) the profile from your old account (C:\documents and settings\username) to your new account.  Then log back in to your new account and everything should be the same.  If for any reason this doesn't work you can always log back into your old account by changing the domain name back to the local computer and logging in with your old account.  The reason I suggest both methods is because on occasion I've found that the Migration Wizard misses some pieces.
0
 

Author Comment

by:sperodev
ID: 22674812
Thanks, but can you give me more details? I just took a look at
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/setup/expert/crawford_november12.mspx
which talks about migrating settings from one XP box to another. Is this the way to go?

I also checked, and migwiz is on the Windows Server 2008 box. But when I run it, I don't see anything that looks useful. The toolbar on the left says Documents, Pictures, Music, Recently Chagned, Searches, and Public.

And the Help file doesn't help at all - apparently it needs an internet connection to work right, and I haven't figured out how to do that, yet.

Do I need to be networked to run migwiz? I have an ethernet connection, but neither computer sees the other. The server has  a static IP and DHCP, so at some point I'm hoping that setting up the ethernet host on the XP box will allow it to get the right IP via DHCP. Does running migwiz also have an option for this? (seems doubtful).
0
 
LVL 15

Accepted Solution

by:
tenaj-207 earned 100 total points
ID: 22674942
Just for some clarification.  You're using XP Pro right now.  And the plan is to setup a 2008 server as a domain controller and join your XP Pro computer to that domain.  Then you will continue to use your XP Pro box.  Is that the case?

If so then you don't need to copy any settings to the server all your settings stay local.  The two methods are 1) using the migration wizard like you linked to in your post, or 2) manually move over the settings by copying the profile over to the new profile.

After you join the PC to the server you will log into the Domain instead of your local computer.  This doesn't mean you log into the server physically you log into your computer which is connected to the domain.  This process creates a new profile on your computer.  In order to make the new profile work like the old profile you have to transfer your settings over using one of the two methods mentioned above.
0
The Ultimate Checklist to Optimize Your Website

Websites are getting bigger and complicated by the day. Video, images, custom fonts are all great for showcasing your product/service. But the price to pay in terms of reduced page load times and ultimately, decreased sales, can lead to some difficult decisions about what to cut.

 
LVL 3

Assisted Solution

by:bertgeysels
bertgeysels earned 100 total points
ID: 22677377
you can copy your local (pc) administrators profile (with all the settings), to the new domain administrators profile. After the pc is joined to the domain, and on uour pc you log on with the administrators account of the domain, a new profile will be created on the pc.
You can copy the settings.
But in order to be able to do the copy, the pc has to be restarted first and then you have to log on to the pc with a 3rd account (so not the old administrator, not the new domain administrator). This 3rd account MUST have full admin rights on your XP. Now you can copy the settings of your old administrator account to the new domain administrator account via System Properties-Advanced-User Profiles.
0
 

Author Comment

by:sperodev
ID: 22702963
It turns out that this was all for nought, since I wanted to join a domain, and I'm running XP MMC. This is mostly like XP Pro, but one of the differences is that you can't join a domain.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:sperodev
ID: 31504503
I would have appreciated a little more detail, such as the fact that Migration Wizard was under Accessories | System Tools.
0

Featured Post

Revamp Your Training Process

Drastically shorten your training time with WalkMe's advanced online training solution that Guides your trainees to action.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Restoring deleted objects in Active Directory has been a standard feature in Active Directory for many years, yet some admins may not know what is available.
When you try to share a printer , you may receive one of the following error messages. Error message when you use the Add Printer Wizard to share a printer: Windows could not share your printer. Operation could not be completed (Error 0x000006…
In this tutorial you'll learn about bandwidth monitoring with flows and packet sniffing with our network monitoring solution PRTG Network Monitor (https://www.paessler.com/prtg). If you're interested in additional methods for monitoring bandwidt…
In this video we outline the Physical Segments view of NetCrunch network monitor. By following this brief how-to video, you will be able to learn how NetCrunch visualizes your network, how granular is the information collected, as well as where to f…

728 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question