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Automatically Connect to DSL

Posted on 2008-10-08
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Last Modified: 2013-12-14
I have  an HP Notebook with Windows Vista Ultimate, 64-bit that has a wireless connection to a LinkSys Access Point that is wired to a Linksys 8-Port Router/Switch. The Router is connected to my desktop computers and to my DSL modem. All of the computers have DHCP enabled to automatically optain an IP address on the workgroup (the workgroup is named MYHOME). The IP address for the router is 192.168.1.1

The desktop computers have Win XP-Pro and when I start one of the XP desktops I can launch I.E. and go directly to a website.
When I start the HP notbook with Win Vista - it automatically connects to the MYHOME network but in order to get Internet access I need to click on the Vista Start button, select 'Connect to", select the Verizon DSL PPPoE and then click on the CONNECT button.
I am then presented with the Username and password dialog (username is already entered and password is already saved) so then I click Connect.

I have logged onto my router (192.168.1.1) and I can see that I have set PPPoE with my Verizon DSL username and a password and that explains why my desktop is automatically connected to the DSL.

How can I configure the Vista notebook so that when it is turned on and gets its IP address (192.168.1.xxx) that it will automatically connect to the DSL so I don't need to go through the Start > Connect to procedure?

Thanks,
Charlie
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Question by:charlieb01
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Expert Comment

by:Casey Herman
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Look for a check box in the wan set up that says "keep alive" Check that box and you should be good.

Casey
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by:charlieb01
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Can you tell me where this check box is located. I can't seem to locate it?
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by:Grizzly072000
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Is your modem connected to your router WAN port?
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by:charlieb01
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Yes, Actually, the Linksys Router/8-port switch unit model BEFSR81 V3 has 8 switch connections and one marked Internet. The DSL modem is plugged into the port marked Internet.
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by:Grizzly072000
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What modem are you using (Make & Model)? Is it wireless?
You should not have a "Verizon DSL PPPoE" profile on your laptop. How did you create it?
Is your access point using an IP outside the router DHCP range?
What are your AP wireless settings?
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Author Comment

by:charlieb01
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The modem is Westell model A90 220015-04
As I recall I used the "Connect to a Network" wizard in Windows Vista
I don't know what the IP address of the Access Point is. The AP is a Linksys Model WAP11
The following items are on the network:
Old Notebook: IP = 192.168.1.101
Desktop # 1 IP = 192.168.1.102
Desktop # 2 IP = 192.168.1.103
My Book World Edition NAS IP = 192.168.1.105

I also have a Linksys 3-port Print server, I believe the IP is 192.168.1.100

I can ping all of the above from the Vista Notebook and can see them on the Network
If I ping 192.168.1.104 I get a timeout - not sure why this IP address is missing.

When I issue IPCONFIG on the Vista Notebook I get the following: (Please keep in mind that I am using this notebook to send this message and that I am using it in WIRELESS so there is no ethernet cable plugged into this notebook at this time)

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.0.6001]
Copyright (c) 2006 Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

C:\Users\charlie>ipconfig

Windows IP Configuration


PPP adapter Verizon DSL:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 151.197.23.251
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.255
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 0.0.0.0

Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::2d79:99c3:73c3:94bc%11
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.106
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Ethernet adapter VMware Network Adapter VMnet1:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::89d5:145:cab0:1a6a%19
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.230.1
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

Ethernet adapter VMware Network Adapter VMnet8:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::60c0:b12:e395:861e%21
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.190.1
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 2:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 8:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 12:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 13:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2002:97c5:17fb::97c5:17fb
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 2002:c058:6301::c058:6301

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 14:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 16:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 17:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 18:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 19:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :

C:\Users\charlie>

 Does this info shed any light on the problem?

Thanks,
Charlie
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Expert Comment

by:Grizzly072000
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I thought you were a beginner, but you know about IPCONFIG /ALL....

192.168.1.104 must be your AP, with ICMP echo disabled (No answer to Ping requests)

Since you can access the Internet, I'll suppose your modem configuration is OK. I suspect an issue with the gateway address used on the laptop.

Regardless, you should delete the PPPoE connection on the laptop. You do not use PPPoE, except on the router.

Go to a desktop, open IE & type 192.168.1.1 in the address bar. What do you see? The modem or the router configuration page?

If you see the modem (like you should), it means the router has another IP address. If you see the router, what address do you use to access the modem configuration?  I'd like to know both addresses.

Please post the output of IPCONFIG /ALL
- From the desktop
- From the laptop when disconnected from the internet (But connected to MYHOME)

Post also the output of arp -a

Note: You can redirect  the output of a command to a text file. Ex.: arp -a >C:\ArpTable.txt

I'm signing off.
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by:charlieb01
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Not at home right now but,
192.168.1.1 gives me the Linksys router configuration page.
The DSL modem is wired to the wall jack and the output of the modem is connected to the linksys router/switch. Some computers are hard-wired to the router (such as the desktops, My Book World Edition, Linksys Print server and the Linksys Access Point)
I will check when I get home to see what happens when I plug the notebook "wired" ethernet cable into the router. That is how it was when I first bought the notebook and set it up. I will be curious to see if that is 192.168.1.104.

I am a bit hesitant at this point to delete the PPPoE from the Vista notebook as the internet connection works as long as I select "Connect to".

I did some further research at lunch today on the Westell DSL modem and it appears that this model is a combo model/router. The only thing about that that does not make sense is that Verizon provided the Westell modem and a separate router.
However, I am now thinking that if it is a combo unit then I sould only need a switch connected to the modem and then connect the rest of my devices to the switch. On the other hand, I assume that my current router is giving me the capability to do the home networking and also providing some firewall protection that I might lose if I were to replace the Linksys router with a switch.

Does this help any?

thanks,
Charlie

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Grizzly072000 earned 500 total points
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Indeed your Westell 2200 is a routing modem operating in bridge mode with the DHCP Server turned off in order to use it with a router. And your router supplies PPPoE with your username and password. I remember working on a Verizon connection and the modem's address was 192.168.1.1, so the router's was something else (198.168.1.2 or 2.1? Doesn't matter, anyway, providing it is different).
Your modem & router settings should be considered OK since you have no trouble on your LAN. The problem is with the Wireless, on the laptop side or the AP side.
Your laptop was 192.198.1.106 at the time. Try entering 192.198.1.104 in IE from a machine wired to the router. You'll probably hit your AP setup page. Which would be good since we need to know the exact settings.
As the PPPoE connection on the laptop, I would definitely remove it since 1- It could be the cause of your problem, and 2- You'll be able to create another one like you did the first.
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by:charlieb01
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Now this is very strange. I tried to use IE to get to 192.168.1.104 and it was not found - I did this from a wired desktop.
I then turned on the Vista notebook and opened IE in an attempt to try to go to 192.168.1.104.
However, at that point the system automatically connected to the Verizon DSL. When I closed IE I got a dialog asking me if I wanted to disconnect the Verizon connection. I clicked the checkbox to never disconnect. I then restarted the notebook and once again when I opened IE it automatically connected me to the Verizon DSL. Cllosing IE this time did not disconnect the Verizon DSL.

So at this point I can get the DSL connection as long as I open IE and it will stay connected as long as the notebook is on!

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Expert Comment

by:Grizzly072000
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192.168.1.104 was probably used at one point. It doesn't mean it has to be allocated. Just look into your router DHCP Clients table.
The only thing new in what you experienced is that you didn't have to enter name & password because they must have been stored somewhere. The laptop is still on a dial-up connection and it's not a normal situation.
But maybe you can live with it.
Just for fun: Type www.showmyip.com in IE on the laptop AND on a desktop.
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by:Grizzly072000
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Thank you for the points.
Did you get the same IP on both machines with www.showmyip.com?
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Author Comment

by:charlieb01
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I guess this is interesting - 2 desktops and 1 notebook are wired to the router and one notebook running with a wireless connection.
I got a different IP on all four machines. a desktop and wireless got 157.197.xxx.xxx
The other desktop and the wired notebook got 141.xxx.xxx.xxx
the xxx in all of the above are different.

Does that make any sense?
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by:Grizzly072000
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Remember I told you that you were not experiencing a normal situation. That's exactly what I was expecting: 2 different public IPs since you have two dial-up connections running.

And I'd be very surprised to learn the contract you signed with Verizon allows you to do that.

I suppose you can always try my last suggestion, and start a new thread if it doesn't work.
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Author Comment

by:charlieb01
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Grizzly,
I created a system restore point and then deleted the PPPoE connection on the notebook. After that I couldn't re-connect to the Internet. Actually couldn't re-create the PPPoE connection.
So, I  used the System Restore to go back to my previous settings and everything works again as it had.
So I am satisfied with the connection method I am now using and thanks to MS for creating a System Restore that actually works.

Thanks again,
Charlie
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Expert Comment

by:Grizzly072000
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I'm sorry you had to restore your system, but I still do not think it's the way to solve your problem in the long term.
I hope you won't run into trouble with Verizon, but I think you should be prepared to experience some connection issues with your desktops. Check what happens to the one(s) sharing their public IP with the laptop once you disconnect the laptop.
Since I'm in the process of cleaning up my account here, I'll stop monitoring this thread.
Nice meeting you. Good luck.
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