How do i install RPMs ignoring the dependencies in RHEL5

I have a RHEL5 machine and i am using it as a mail server.The sendmail version in it is the deafult one which gets along with RHEL5. Now I want to upgrade the sendmail to newer version. I have downloaded the rpms and when i tried to install it , it says that some libcypto.s0.7 file is required for it, and when i try to install the openssl ( which installs libcrypto.so.) it asks fro glibc.2_8, and the dependency chain goes on. And at some point i have faced a dead lock situation( dont exaclty remember the file names) like when i isntall fileA it says fileB is needed, and vice versa. I got frustrated and used 'rpm --nodeps' for installing all the RPMs and some how the new sendmail version got installed. But after reboot many programs are showing up error messages like 'cannot access shared libraries'..anyone please help me with this RPMs.. How to upgrade the glibc and other library files without affecting the programs that are using them...by the way mine is free version( not licensed, no yumupdates :) )
subbaraiAsked:
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urgollConnect With a Mentor Commented:
I still stand by my original reply: Of course, now we know the 'where you got them', i.e. rpmfind.net. However, there's no garantee they are conpatible with RHEL5.

So the best course of action would be:
- Remove RPM from untrusted source
- Install the original RHEL5 RPMs from install media
- Confirm that the system is stable again.
- Upgrade to the latest sendmail from CentOS 5 to get the latest security updates. I believe that will get you 8.13, and not 8.14.


My original answer:

Did you keep a list of all the RPMs you 'upgraded' ? And can you tell us where you got them from ?Some packages are critical to the stability of the system, glibc being the most critical one as it is used by every single application on the system. By definition, you cannot upgrade glibc without affecting other programs.I think that the best course of action right now is to remove those RPMs that you tried to upgrade, and replace them with straight RHEL5 ones from your install media.Once that is done and you have a system that's stable again, you can go back to upgrading software.If you want a source of 3rd party packages that work well with RHEL5, you should have a look at Dag Wieers' repository at:http://dag.wieers.com/rpm/packages/
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urgollCommented:
Greetings,
First of all, when you say you're using 'free' RHEL5, do you mean CentOS version 5, or is it RHEL5 for which you are not paying a license ? If it's the later, just don't say it. And you should switch to CentOS5 and be legal.

As for the RPM, there's usually a very good reason when RPM complains about bad dependencies. In your case, you probably got a sendmail RPM from a 3rd party source which either wasn't designed for RHEL5 or for a newer version of RHEL5 than what you have.

Did you keep a list of all the RPMs you 'upgraded' ? And can you tell us where you got them from ?

Some packages are critical to the stability of the system, glibc being the most critical one as it is used by every single application on the system. By definition, you cannot upgrade glibc without affecting other programs.

I think that the best course of action right now is to remove those RPMs that you tried to upgrade, and replace them with straight RHEL5 ones from your install media.

Once that is done and you have a system that's stable again, you can go back to upgrading software.

If you want a source of 3rd party packages that work well with RHEL5, you should have a look at Dag Wieers' repository at:
http://dag.wieers.com/rpm/packages/

Regards,
Christophe
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joolsCommented:
urgoll: I thought RHEL was free, you just paid for the support and updates.

You can however, use RHEL 5 and configure the Centos repositories then use yum to update, over time it will turn itself into a Centos system anyway.
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urgollCommented:
No, RHEL is not free. Red Hat uses a subscription model where you pay a given amount per year per server, where the amount you pay is based on the level of support and type of server you have.

RHEL is (mostly) open-source, which is how CentOS exists - they remove the non-open-source bits from RHEL (mostly the packages with the trademarks), rebuild and repackage everything and replace up2date with yum.

From CentOS.org :
Before building the OS, non-free packages are altered. Non-free packages would include those encumbered with a non-redistributable copyright or trademark.

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joolsCommented:
Apologies, this is OT. It wasnt what I was told when I did the RHCE.

I found this; https://www.redhat.com/about/whysubscriptions/
Nice video, the bloke says it's free (open source).

The subscription is the support and updates which seems like a fair deal to me.
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urgollCommented:
jools,
in that video, the term 'free' means open source, and applies to the underlying technology. It doesn't say that the distribution is free of charge, that you can download the ISO and deploy on as many computers as you want. It means that you have the freedom of accessing the source code of the operating system and make changes if you so wish. And after you have made changes, you can distribute those changes to whoever you want.

This freedom is what enables CentOS to offer a distribution that's 99% identical to RHEL.
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joolsCommented:
I have an answer from RedHat (below).

You are not using RHEL illegally. Have a go at configuring yum for Centos repositories, you may need to force the installation of some packages first.

<paste>
You may request a free 30 day evaluation via our website. This will allow you to download the software and get updates for 30 days. Following this period you will no longer get any updates however you are more than welcome to continue using the software. This evaluation does not include any support.

In order to request the evaluation please follow the instructions below:

1. Go to https://www.redhat.com
2. Click on 'Downloads' at the very top of the page.
3. On the next page you will see a list of products that can be tested.

Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any further questions.

Kind Regards,

Liv

EMEA - Customer Service Associate
</paste>
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subbaraiAuthor Commented:
urgoll,
Thanks for your reply. I am using the RHEL5 free version. I want to upgrade the sendmail to the lastest version. i have downloaded the sendmail-8.14.3-1.fc10.i386.rpm (also cf and devel)from rpmfind.net
this all happened while i was installing it. Now when i start the server while booting its giving message like "cannot open font file latarchyher..." and after that its showing the blue screen with pop up saying " GDM was doesnot exist. Please correct the GDM" ( not exact) , when i press the OK button, its asking for the login and password. i gave the root and pcorrect password...thats it the system hung. Any way i will reinstall the OS...:). But can you please tell me how to upgrade using RPMs . I mean are there any precautions to be taken whitle upgrading.
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