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What does "Delivery Receipt Requested" confirm?

EE
In an Outlook/Exchange 2000 environment, what does the "Delviery Recept Requested" option in a message confirm?  I was under the impression that it only confirmed delivery to the local Exchange server (the sender's Exchange server) but now I'm thinking it may actually confirm delivery to the recipient's mail server.  Any MS docs on this would be appreciated.  Thanks.
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JohnDemerjian
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JohnDemerjian
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2 Solutions
 
ngmarowaCommented:
Delivery receipts can occur across domains depending on settings. You can block delivery receipts outside your domain
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war1Commented:
Hello JohnDemerjian,

It confirms that Exchange has receive the email.  "f you are using the CW installation of Outlook with Microsoft Exchange Server as your mail service, Exchange will always respond to requests for a read receipt."

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/192929

Hope this helps!
war1
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JohnDemerjianAuthor Commented:
war1

the support article you referenced doesn't specifically state that these receipts confirm delivery to the local vs. destination mail server.  you stated it confirms Exchange has received the email.  is that the local exchange server of the sender or the recipients mail server at a totally different company after traversing the Internet?  this is my real issue.  i need to know which delivery it confirms.
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ngmarowaCommented:
The receipt comes from the destination server and it traverse through the internet back to your server. It confirms that the email is now the receivers mailbox
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JohnDemerjianAuthor Commented:
ngmarowa:

can you please provide some documentation to support this statement.  i can't find that statement anywhere on the web and it is contrary to what i am seeing.  it would be nice to know one way or the other.
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ngmarowaCommented:
Do not have documentation but from experience. A return receipt (delivery or read) will be treated as a normal email. When the sender has requested a delivery receipt an email is generated when the email is delivered. That how I understand it.

However some mail servers are configured to drop the return email hence you dont always get a delivered receipt. The main issue is that spammers can generate random emails and a delivery receipt can confirm that the email address exists and can target it rather than continue sending random emails.
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JohnDemerjianAuthor Commented:
my experience, as of a minute ago, is that my local smtp server gives me the delivery receipt and says "i can't confirm the other side got it but i did send it".  i run exchange.  my friend runs notes and his smtp server says the same thing.  so it seems that the local smtp server sends the delivery confirmation and knows nothing about the remote smtp.
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war1Commented:
You asked, "you stated it confirms Exchange has received the email.  is that the local exchange server of the sender or the recipients mail server at a totally different company after traversing the Internet?"

It is the receiving server.
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war1Commented:
Perhaps you selected Delivery Receipt, which confirms delivery from your SMTP server, and not Read Receipts, which confirms delivery at destination server.
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ngmarowaCommented:
If your server is sending it, it means that your server has successfully sent the email to the destination server and the mailbox exists on the destination server.

Try sent an email to a non-existent email address and request a delivery receipt. I bet you wont get it meaning you only get the confirmation if the email if sent successfully and the mailbox exists. Your server may be the one sending the email but the trigger is from the destination server.
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JohnDemerjianAuthor Commented:
thanks to you both.  sending an email to a non-existent email address, as suggested, was the thing that made me a believer.  
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