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link button to submit form

I'm sure this is really easy - once you know rails - (or if you haven't been living in a .NET sandbox for 5 years), but, how can I get a regular ole form submit button in the shape of a link?

I tried taking  <%= link_to url  "Click Me",   { :action => "foo"} %>
and turning it into
<%= link_to url  "Click Me", :method => :post,   { :action => "foo"} %>

but that created some weird error that I don't have right this second.  I know you can also set up a regular <a> tag, and point it to a javascript function that submits the form, but I know there's got to be a Rails way to do this.

Thanks!
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ARACK04
Asked:
ARACK04
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1 Solution
 
ozatamanCommented:
Hey there,

You should do:

<%= link_to  "Click Me",   { :action => "foo"}, {:method => :post} %>

Cheers,
OA

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ARACK04Author Commented:
Geez.  Could I trouble you for some education on why you need the {} around the :method => :post
???

Thanks!
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ARACK04Author Commented:
THANK YOU!!!
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ozatamanCommented:
Sure,

The method takes two hash arguments. Ruby will automatically convert what it sees last in the call to hash, if it is in a hash form. However, if you are going to supply two separate hashes: one has the url description and a second as html_parameters, then you would have to use the proper Hash class form { }.

Hope this helps,
OA
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ARACK04Author Commented:
I'm completely new to rails - so would you mind explaining why the following works (from Rails API).  Why does this example not need the {}  - I don't care about adding the {} - I just want to understand better what I'm doing.  Thanks!


  link_to "Delete Image", @image, :confirm => "Are you sure?", :method => :delete


  # => <a href="/images/9" onclick="if (confirm('Are you sure?')) { var f = document.createElement('form');
       f.style.display = 'none'; this.parentNode.appendChild(f); f.method = 'POST'; f.action = this.href;
       var m = document.createElement('input'); m.setAttribute('type', 'hidden'); m.setAttribute('name', '_method');
       m.setAttribute('value', 'delete'); f.appendChild(m);f.submit(); };return false;">Delete Image</a>
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ozatamanCommented:
I see.

In this case, @image takes care of the url destination, and all the trailing parameters then get perceived as one hash, in which case you don't have to explicitly put {}. In you original case, though, there were two separate hash arguments, and so you need to explicitly state them.
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