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For the best security on an Exchange 2007 deployment, I really don't want to open up port 80 on the firewall. I will be using SSL certificates for OWA 2007 from Verisign.

Posted on 2008-10-10
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
I am deploying client access servers in exchange 2007. I plan to use SSL cerificates from Verisign with OWA. However, many outside users with legacy web browsers might not be able to connect with https   Are there any functions in OWA 2007 which require http?  I really don't want to expose the internal lan to port 80 if not necessary. An ISA reverse proxy setup will be deployed later, but now we need the client access server behind the inside firewall (not in the dmz) and OWA up and running. I can see the help deskphones ringing off the hook from the external users who can't connect via http if their browsers are not patched.  With only SSL port 443 open with a signed certificate from verisign,, there is a higher security configuration on the OWA deployment.

What is your suggestion?
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Question by:bignewf
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by:Paranormastic
Paranormastic earned 125 total points
ID: 22688945
I think you are worrying too much.
SSL has been supported since before IE3.  Pretty much every browser in use today uses 128 bit SSL, if you are really worried about it then just don't force 128 bit SSL so that those that do support it will use 128 bit and those that are ancient and haven't been patched in 7 years can dumb down to an older version of SSL.
Verisign has been around long enough where they should have their root pretty much whereever you go since they date back to the mid-90s.  You're not going to do much better than that and if you are worried about that, there are few alternatives.
Realistically, even the guy running win98 has patched sometime over the last 7 years or so to access their banking site or whatever.  If they are too freaked out to access your SSL page, then they will be entirely too paranoid to supply anything that would require SSL (password, bank info, whatever) and live in a cave.  You will likely cause more of an issue by not having SSL enabled for sensitive pages than worrying about the theoretical user that won't be able to use SSL.
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bignewf earned 0 total points
ID: 22688984
Thanks for your answer. That covered everything.
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