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Max connections per socket

I'm trying to figure out how/where I can determine the maximum number of connections a socket can have. We're using IBM AIX v5.2, ML 2.
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ddavis78725
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ddavis78725
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woolmilkporcCommented:
Hi,
have a look at this:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Unix/AIX/Q_22056628.html

Basically it's the "somaxconn" value which is of intererest here.
With "no -o somaxconn" you will probably see
"somaxconn = 1024" which is the default value in AIX
for the maximum listen backlog.

To change, enter "no -o somaxconn=[new value]"

For further information concerning "Netwok Options"
simply consult no' s manpage ("man no")

Also, you might want to consult the AIX documentation about the listen() subroutine found in:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/pseries/v5r3/index.jsp?topic=/com.ibm.aix.commtechref/doc/commtrf2/listen.htm

Norbert



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gheistCommented:
Which way that socket will have those connections?

basically when you accept() it creates new socket. thats limited by system resources then.

it is sub-optimal to have more than 200 sockets/process (like apache).
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woolmilkporcCommented:
Hi,
now that we heard about listen() and accept(), here's the complete sequence
used to create sockets and work with them.
Only some preliminaries and the subroutine calls are shown, other coding is left out.
The clue is, as gheist said, the accept() subroutine (see my comment (==>) under accept() below).
The quoted ("") comments are extracted from IBM documentation (see the link I provided in my first post).
If you wish I can give you the complete sample program I once wrote for demonstration purposes.
Norbert
/* Some preliminaries: */
 
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
 
int sockfd, newsockfd;   /* fds for socket(), accept() */
struct sockaddr_in serv_addr, cli_addr; /* sockaddr_in from <netinet/in.h> */
long clilen; /* in linux 'int'! */
char buffer[];
 
/* socket() : 
"The socket subroutine creates a socket in the specified AddressFamily and of the specified type.
The socket subroutine returns a descriptor (an integer) that can be used in later subroutines 
that operate on sockets." */
 
sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0); /* Address family, type, protocol */
 
/* bind() :
"The bind subroutine assigns a Name parameter to an unnamed socket. 
Sockets created by the socket subroutine are unnamed; 
they are identified only by their address family. 
Subroutines that connect sockets either assign names or use unnamed sockets." 
struct sockaddr comes from <sys/socket.h> */
 
bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &serv_addr, sizeof(serv_addr));
 
/* listen() :
"The listen subroutine performs the following activities:
- Identifies the socket that receives the connections. 
- Marks the socket as accepting connections. 
- Limits the number of outstanding connection requests in the system queue." */
 
listen(sockfd, 5);                      /* 5 = Queue depth! */
 
/* accept() :
"The accept subroutine extracts the first connection on the queue of pending connections, creates a new socket with the same properties as the specified socket, and allocates a new file descriptor for that socket
The accepted socket cannot accept more connections. 
The original socket remains open and can accept more connections"
==> This is what gheist said: 
The number of accepted sockets is limited only by your program or system resources. <== */
 
newsockfd = accept(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &cli_addr, &clilen);
 
/* Now do whatever you want with the accepted socket */
 
read(newsockfd, buffer, 255);
write(newsockfd, "Message xxxxxxxx", 17);
 
/* close the accepted socket */
close(newsockfd);
 
/* At the very end, close the original (listening) socket) */
close(sockfd);

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gheistCommented:
Please add some remarkable comments in your code for us to see where you need to know the limit and on what resource.
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woolmilkporcCommented:
@gheist: I suppose you're talking to ddavis78725 and not to me (woolmilkporc)?
I'm a little confused, because ddavis78725 didn't supply any code yet, and my code above is only for explaining purposes.
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ddavis78725Author Commented:
This is what I was looking for. Thanks.
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