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Connecting a Roku Netflix Player to Cable

Posted on 2008-10-12
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Last Modified: 2013-11-12
I would like to connect a Roku Netflix Player to the internet via a cable connection.  In a different part of my home, I am running a mixed wired / wireless network using a Linksys Wireless G cable Gateway also connected to the cable.  What is the best way to connect the Roku Player?  Thanks!!
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Question by:lehmannkg
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by:TSchug
ID: 22700179
Hi,
What do you mean by cabled connection? Do you mean, you want to plug it into the network instead of using a wireless connection?

There isn't much advantage to using a wired connection with the Roku Netflix player, because all video is streamed over the internet and the quality would max out you internet connection before your wireless connection.

You should just be able to connect to your linksys wireless connection in the Setup Wizard on the Netflix player.
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by:lehmannkg
ID: 22700237
Unfortunately, the wireless signal doesn't reach the location of the Roku Player, and I can't run an Ethernet cable from the gateway to the Player, either.  So I'm looking for something to connect directly to the cable near the TV (second router??).  Also, wouldn't the WiFi bandwidth be suboptimal?
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by:TSchug
ID: 22700241
Gotcha. You would not be able to connect to the coaxial cable by the TV, (except possibly buying another modem and separate IP, but that's not realistic.)

Do you know how far out of reach your wireless is? Perhaps a more powerful antenna might do the trick. You could also get a wireless bridge/extender and place it somewhere between the room and the wireless router to extend the signal.

Wifi bandwidth would be plenty, keep in mind that Netflix is streaming videos from the internet, so it wouldn't be more then your internet connection (probably 1-5mbits), where as your wireless is capable up to 54mbits at full strength.
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by:lehmannkg
ID: 22700255
Thanks, but I'd still prefer a hardwired solution if feasible.
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TSchug earned 250 total points
ID: 22700262
Hey -- Alright, I think I'm out of ideas except PowerLine internet. D-Link makes a kit, but it's kinda expensive, a lot more then a wireless repeater. I didn't look into it too much, I'm not sure what speeds those are capable of.

http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=533
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