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Adding wireless router to DNS  in server 2003

Posted on 2008-10-13
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
I have a Dell server cabled to a switch with several other desktops which are all already in the AD and DNS and working fine. I do not know how to add the wireless router to DNS. The wireless router is a netgear. Thanks
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Question by:george322332
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NutrientMS earned 500 total points
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I assume this is so you can access your wireless access point by using a name instead of an IP Address?

On your Domain Controller, Open DNS
Go to Forward Lookup Zone
Right-click on your internal DNS Zone and choose New Host (A)
Add the name you want to use, and the IP Address of the Access Point
Click Add Host

You should now be able to ping <NAME> or <FQDN NAME> of your access point. In my case, Wireless or wireless.cpal.local would work.

Cheers
DNS-Host.jpg
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by:btassure
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Is it just so you can type say "router" into IE/ping and have it resolve to the address of the device?
If so there are two ways:
either do it through DHCP as it ought to register in DNS when it connects (give it a reservation though!)
or
go into your DNS control panel, then into the server, then the forward lookup zone you want to use (domain.com). In the right pane, right click and create a new A record. Fill in the address and hostname fields. Job done.
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by:btassure
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Damn. Didn't type fast enough!
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by:andrewmilo
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Maybe I'm off base here, but why is this any different than any other device?

I assume you are using static IP's?

If so, give it a static IP through the setup routine, and add it to the DNS like any other device.

You have to decide if the machines behind it will use their own IP scheme through NAT, or if you are going to simply have it be an access point and not a router.

If you want it as an access point, machines connected through the wireless will have the same IP scheme as the rest of your network.

If you want it to be a router, it will have a WAN address (your normal IP scheme) and then anything connected to it will have a different scheme and potentially use DHCP to connect.

It all depends upon how you want it set up.

How do you have it set up now?
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