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Where is my reverse DNS set?

Posted on 2008-10-13
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Last Modified: 2010-04-07
I was changing some entries in our DNS records yesterday, and realized that the company handling our DNS-records, dont handle the reverse dns lookups.
I can see that several of reverse dns records are wrong, and some domains dont even have a reverse dns record.
How can I find out who is handling our reverse dns? Does it exist a tool that can find out where the dns answer originally comes from?
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Question by:evuhleye
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Chris Dent earned 500 total points
ID: 22709536

It will be your ISP (network connection provider) unless they've explicitly delegated that to you.

You can find out where a specific reverse lookup zone is with something like the following example:

1. Public IP address / subnet is: 1.2.3.4
2. Reverse Lookup Zone name is 3.2.1.in-addr.arpa
3. Name servers responsible for zone can be found with: nslookup -q=ns 3.2.1.in-addr.arpa

NSLookup isn't the best tool for chasing these down, however unless we get stuck there's little point in downloading better tools.

Chris
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by:evuhleye
ID: 22709920
Thanks for great answer Chris-Dent!
nslookup -q=ns x.x.x.in-addr.arpa did the trick:)
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