Linux for dummies - the df command - EASY POINTS

Is this telling me tha I have one large partition, one partition for boot, and Shared memory?

Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
                      74151120   2773840  67610600   4% /
/dev/sda1               101086     34285     61582  36% /boot
none                   2074516         0   2074516   0% /dev/shm

Also, mount gives me:

/dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00 on / type ext3 (rw)
none on /proc type proc (rw)
none on /sys type sysfs (rw)
none on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,gid=5,mode=620)
usbfs on /proc/bus/usb type usbfs (rw)
/dev/sda1 on /boot type ext3 (rw)
none on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw)
none on /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc type binfmt_misc (rw)
sunrpc on /var/lib/nfs/rpc_pipefs type rpc_pipefs (rw)

From this, it looks like I have only one SCSI drive - is this correct? Also, where is my CD-ROM AND what is sunrpc?

Sorry - I am new to Linux.

Who is Participating?
Michael WorshamConnect With a Mentor Infrastructure / Solutions ArchitectCommented:
For one thing, /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00 means you are using Linux LVM (Logical Volume Manager).

Try doing:

To display logical volume groups: lvdisplay -v
To display physcial volume groups: pvdisplay -v


The 'mount' command will only show what devices are currently mounted. If you want to mount your CD-ROM, you would need to check first to see what your Linux kernel detected the device as.

Type 'dmesg' and see if there if a reference to your CD-ROM (usually detected like either hda, hdb, hdc).
Michael WorshamInfrastructure / Solutions ArchitectCommented:
The /var/lib/nfs/rpc_pipefs is a bit complex. You need it, so don't mess with it.

Gabriel OrozcoConnect With a Mentor Solution ArchitectCommented:
yes, it appears you have a scsi drive.

you have your / (ROOT) partition created using LVM. this is good if you plan to grow.
you have your /boot partition not using LVM. that is okay.

in order to see your cdrom, you need first to insert a cd/dvd into the drive, then your system will mount it, or you will need to mount it by hand (not likely). once you tried to browse your inserted cd, it will be mounted, and mount will show it to you.
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Duncan RoeConnect With a Mentor Software DeveloperCommented:
The /dev/shm entry looks odd to me. shm is a file system based on shared memory (i.e. RAM & swap) - often people mount /tmp on it (all contents of /tmp are thus flushed on system shutdown). Did you mean to have a swap device? - it looks like you don't have one. That can be OK - I don't have one either. Post the output from "free" if you'd like confirmation. Also please post /etc/fstab so we eperts can better advise you.
pbhjConnect With a Mentor Commented:
$ sudo fdisk -l
# fdisk -l

Can give useful physical disk info as can the kinfocentre and gparted / qtparted (or just parted if you like CLI).

Out of interest, what computer is this, what distro?
MysidiaConnect With a Mentor Commented:
It  is standard for /dev/shm  to be mounted this way,  on Redhat, and yes, there are some system scripts and software that make use of it,  so unounting /dev/shm  can break things.

As for 'sunrpc on /var/lib/nfs/rpc_pipefs type rpc_pipefs (rw)'

If you use NFS, you need it.
If you don't use NFS, then turn off all the NFS and RPC services, and  that won't get mounted.   (This is a virtual fs)

SCSI partition 1  on /boot
On  /  you have a LVM  logical volume.
use  'vgs'   to  display volume group list
'pvs'  to display physical volume (disk) list
'lvs'  to display logical volume list

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