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Connect to Outlook Anywhere- Behind Web Proxy

We have OWA and RPC over HTTPS setup on our Exchange 2003 server, and both are working perfectly.

Some of our users are working at client sites and must connect to the internet through the client's web proxy. OWA uses the proxy authentication credentials that are saved in IE and connects without any problem. Outlook Anywhere does not use the saved credentials and will not connect.

We examined the HTTP traffic using Fiddler and found that the proxy authentication header is blank for Outlook Anywhere requests, but we can use Fiddler to inject the credentials and Outlook Anywhere connects.

Is there a way to configure this in Outlook 2007 so that we do not have to use this tool?? I have been through every setting I can find, and don't see a way to do it.
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hb0001
Asked:
hb0001
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1 Solution
 
hb0001Author Commented:
No response since yesterday, points value increased.
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ATIGCommented:
Sounds like more of an issue with the proxy that you are connect through as Rpc/https uses basic or ntlm credentials when connecting, if that is not being passed then you will have connections problems.
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hb0001Author Commented:
Well the problem is that I don't see a way to tell Outlook to pass the web proxy credentials so that we can even get out of the client's network. We can use a tool called Fiddler to insert the web proxy credentials into the HTTP request, and the web proxy then allows the traffic out to the internet and Outlook Anywhere can connect to our Exchange server. I was just curious whether there was a way to configure this in Outlook so that our users do not have to use this 3rd party tool every time they connect, but I am starting to think the answer is "no."

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reidreCommented:
You may try this one:

Change winhttp proxy settings using:

For XP: proxycfg -u
For Vista: netsh winhttp set proxy ...

Let me know if this works
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hb0001Author Commented:
Thanks for the suggestion. I forgot this question was still open! I will see if we can test that and post back.
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FylarCommented:
@reidre
I'm also experiencing the same issue, and tried your solution, but unfortunately, Outlook still appears to be unable to connect. :(
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whitsellcsCommented:
I am also having this problem.  A working solution would be appreciated.
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FylarCommented:
It might be worthwhile to keep this open, atleast to acknowledge that there is no practical solution, at this point in time.

As a solution comes available, this  could then be updated.

My 0.02c

Cheers.

Fylar

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reidreCommented:
I eventually got this working.
Say your proxy server is PROXY.domain.com
Open CMD
type: cmdkey /add:PROXY.domain.com /user:USER /pass:PASSWORD

USER and PASSWORD should grant access to the proxy server.
This works for NT authentication, not basic auth.

Good luck!
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FylarCommented:
I think that it has now been answered. I'm not in a position to test it at the moment, but I think that it now has some valuable things to try.
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FylarCommented:
cmdkey doesn't seem to be part of the default winXP install.

Am I missing something? A password harvesting program perhaps? ;)
Say your proxy server is PROXY.domain.com
Open CMD
type: cmdkey /add:PROXY.domain.com /user:USER /pass:PASSWORD

Open in new window

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reidreCommented:
cmdkey is by standard not part of Windows XP.  You can copy cmdkey.exe from a W2K3 server to your XP build.  This should work.
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