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Why can't I apply Photoshop auto variations to my image?

I want to adjust the colour in a large image. It is 800Mb, stored as TIF/LZW. Because it is such a large image, I made a thumbnail (1280x554 pixels), adjusted the colour and saved the changes I made with Image/Adjustments/Variations as an AVA, then I loaded the original and tried to apply the AVA file. I got a message along the lines of "Can't do that - it's the wrong sort of file." I checked Image/Mode and the original is  RGB Color and 8 bits/channel. What else could be wrong?

JFI: I am a complete noob to Photoshop and have never used any version prior to CS3.
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kilgore661
Asked:
kilgore661
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1 Solution
 
nzrubinCommented:
why the image is so huge? is it a billboard?  
what resolution it has?
 i think first of all we need to  reduce the image! it looks very weird! 800Mb!

i made a billboard recently 15x3 meters and i had output file for printing 100mb


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David BruggeCommented:
What are the dimensions of your file?

Photoshop has a limit of 30,000 pixels in height or width for its native format. With version CS and later, you can work on larger files, but they must be saved as RAW, PSB (Photoshop Large Format) or TIFF. When working on a file with a dimension larger than 30,000 pixels, the Variations option should be grayed out. I'm surprised that you are able to bring up the Variations dialogue up, but I'm not surprised that you get an error.

As a workaround, try making a new thumbnail with the original color ( or in your case, colour ) and this time add a color adjustment layer (plus any other adjustment layer that you feel that you might need).

Then open both files at once and drag the adjustment layer(s) from your thumbnail layers pallet to your full size image (they will show up in the full size file's layer pallet.) They will now make the same adjustments to your full size image that they made to the thumb. You can save this file as a PSB file if you want to retain the editability of the adjustment layers and then do a separate "save as" if you need the output to be a TIFF file.

Best of luck.


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kilgore661Author Commented:
nzrubin,

I am a gigapanographer. 800Mb is small for me - I often have trouble making files small enough to fit into TIF's 2Gb limit. Here is an example: http://www.gigapan.org/viewGigapan.php?id=10381 - this is over 150,000 pixels wide.


D Brugge,

The file *is* over 30Kpix wide and *is* a tif, and Variations *is* greyed (or in your case grayed) out. I got the error message by double-clicking on the thumbnail's AVA when PS had the original large image open. But your workaround works for me thanks!
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David BruggeCommented:
A gigapanographer. That's a new on on me.  In the old days, we used to copy our images to an 8" x 10" internegative, doctor the neg to hide the overlaps, then put the neg into an enlarger with the head turned on its side and project the image across the room to an oversized sheet of photo paper. I made a 4' x 8' canoe out of a sheet of plywood turned up at each end to process the paper. I then had to take it outside to hose it down to wash off the hypo.

Those were the days (sigh). Your method looks a bit  more productive.

Best of luck to you and thanks for the points.


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