What causes an Access form to grey out when it opens?

I have form that was completely functional yesterday. Today when I opened it, the entire form is greyed-out in Form/Layout views. All the details can been seen in design view.

Tried decompile/compact/repair... exporting to a blank database... still the same.

Didn't find anything like this in searching EE, or the internet... any ideas?

Thanks.
greyed-out-form.bmp
Destiny947Asked:
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Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
First thought, the RecordSource of the form returns zero records.
Second thought, you're using Access 2007, so who the heck knows..
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SheilsCommented:
Go to the property of the form and click on the data tab. If you don't have any data in your record source you have to have "Allow Addition" set to "yes".

What are you using as record set a query or a table
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omgangIT ManagerCommented:
<<Second thought, you're using Access 2007, so who the heck knows.>>

made my day jimhorn....thanks!
OM Gang
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Destiny947Author Commented:
Hi Jim,

>Access 2007.... :) exactly how I feel.

sb9

I'll check my properties, even though I haven't worked on this form in a couple of weeks...

brb
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
Are you running this across the WAN we discussed in earlier questions?

I'd suspect corruption ... do you have a recent backup? In the case of extensive corruption you may not be able to recover.

I'd also STRONGLY suggest you do your development work in 2007 ... 2007 users can run a 2003 database, and the 2003 format is much more stable than the 07 format.
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Destiny947Author Commented:
Hi sb9,

Yep... Allow Additions is set to yes...

Lovely, 2007... so very unpredictable...
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Destiny947Author Commented:
Hi LSM,

I am developing on a laptop with 2007 setting at 2002-2003. And I have countless backups...

This does seem like corruption.
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Destiny947Author Commented:
Also... thanks for all of your fast responses!
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Destiny947Author Commented:
Hi LSM,

Is using 2007 with the default file format set at 2002-2003 is what you meant?
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
<Is using 2007 with the default file format set at 2002-2003 is what you meant?>

Not really, although it's better that using the .accdb format. 2003 is much more stable than is 07, which is why you would be better off developing in 2003, even if your endusers will be using 2007.
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Destiny947Author Commented:
Hi LSM,

Thanks again for your input. Develop in 2003 only. That's what I need.

As far as the corruption issue. Do you suspect that this will continue to occur until I change from 2007 to 2003?
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
Working in 2007 with the 2003 format seems to give me more problems than other configurations. Granted I don't use 07 a lot, but I have a couple of clients who have moved to 07 and I do like to finish up those code sessions in Access 2007 just to be sure.

If you must work in 07, then build a new blank database in 07 (in the .mdb format) and import everything to it. This seems to work better than anything else for reduce the chances of corruption.
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Destiny947Author Commented:
Hi LSM,

Had to think real hard on that one... :-)  And am going to do just that.

LSM... I think that is going to work!

Thanks so much!
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