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IP Address in the wrong range

Posted on 2008-10-18
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What will happen if I have a network 192.168.10.x 255.255.255.0 and I place a pc on the network with a statically assigned ip address of 10.10.1.1 255.255.255.0? Will the pc function how will the routing be affected?
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Question by:jlgray48
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Static-shock earned 500 total points
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The host will only be able to see itself, because the broadcast will be 10.10.1.255. So when its sends out network messages  its going to be sending it to hosts for that range. The 192.168.1.0/24 will ignore the traffic b/c they are listening for 192.168.1.0 traffic. The routers will do the same and wont pass the traffic through. I hope this clears it up.
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by:Darr247
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> The routers will do the same and wont pass the traffic through.

Actually, a 10.x.x.x /24 on the WAN and 192.168.x.x /24 on the LAN side WILL talk to each other through a router.
That's exactly what a router is for - connecting different networks. :-)
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by:Mysidia
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"What will happen if I have a network 192.168.10.x 255.255.255.0 and I place a pc on the network with a statically assigned ip address of 10.10.1.1 255.255.255.0? Will the pc function how will the routing be affected?"


Then the PC is by definition on a different LOGICAL ip network,  because you have configured it to be on a different logical IP network, even though they are on the same physical Layer 2 network.    Just configuring a PC to have a  non-existent  IP outside the valid range won't automatically make any routers change.

The PC will be able to communicate with the other PCs and the router over Ethernet broadcasts, but this is not very useful,  protocols that rely on IPv4   rely on there being LOGICAL layer 3  connectivity between the PCs.


The only way it can communicate with the other PCs on your LAN  is if you make a routing change  to enable it.

You need  a router on that has an ip address  10.10.1.0/255.255.255.0    network.
The PC  must be configured to use that router's IP on the 10  network as its default gateway,  in the PC's  network configuration settings.

If the router has internet connectivity, then that is enough for the PC to have internet connectivity,  but not enough to communicate with PCs on your LAN in the 192 network.



That router must either be the same router,  or be able to communicate with the same router that handles the 192 network,  for the PCs on different logical networks to be able to communicate with each other.

I.E.  The router will either need two network interfaces, one with a 10  IP and one with say a 192 IP,    or it will need one  interface with a 10 IP and a 192 IP.

(Another possibility is the two routers have other IPs in a shared router A<->B subnet;  Router A is configured to send the 10  network to Router B using router B's IP on the A<->B shared subnet as the next hop address,  and  Router B is configured to send the 192 network to Router A, using Router A's ip as the next hop address on the  A<->B shared subnet)

For the PC on the 10 network to be able to use the router to communicate with PCs on the 192 network.

[The routing table on your router(s)  will need to be configured according to your specific situation.]


On a single router  where  you have  assigned a secondary IP address to the ethernet interface,  this should be automatic.

With no manual configuration on the router other than adding the secondary IP.

But not all types of routers support secondary IPs on the interface.

For that reason, you may require two router interfaces on the router plugged into the same network.

*This is no good if your router is really a consumer broadband router.
Those devices  only provide a maximum of 2 interfaces;
1 WAN interface  (which is a router interface).

And usually a 4 port  switch   (and all 4 ports are connected to the same router interface).





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by:Dawilliams
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Generally that all good advice, and mostly correct the device won't communicate with any of the other devices,until at least some other configuration is done,but the real answer can't be known until we know what type of switch/router this connects to.
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