Nagios on a VM

Hello Experts,

I am planning on installing nagios and I am contemplating on installing it on a virtual machine.  I plan to monitor approximately 150 nodes.  I somewhat have mixed review in regards as to whether a vm can handle it or would I be better off on dedicating an actually hw for this?  Any thoughts and suggestion would greatly be appreciated.

As always, thank you for your time on this matter.
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coperatorAsked:
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hakkekushouCommented:
Sure thing!

GRANT OPERATIONTYPE ON DBOBJECT TO USERORPROFILENAME

DENY OPERATIONTYPE ON DBOBJECT TO USERORPROFILENAME

*OPERATIONTYPE would be SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, EXECUTE, etc...

*DBOBJECT would be a table, procedure, database, schema, etc...

*USERORPROFILENAME would be the name of a DB user or security profile such as public or owner
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hakkekushouCommented:
Could a moderator please remove the post above? It seems I had one to many tabs open and posted the wrong answer in the wrong thread. I thank you in advance and my apologies for the inconveniences caused.

I assume there is good reason for not having edit/delete feature a typical message board would have so I won't ask why.

Regards.
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wilhelm_voigtCommented:
Nagios isn't terribly resource intensive, as long as you don't set every check interval to very small values (such as checking every service on every host every minute). Further, it certainly depends on the number of services per host and what kind of service check you use.

I'd give it a shot in any case, since I can't see a risk in trying it. If it turns out that the VM isn't cutting it, you can still install Nagios on another machine and just copy the config files.
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larstrCommented:
Running it inside a VM is not much slower than running it directly on a physical host if setup correctly. The most critical thing here will be that your storage subsystem is fast enough to handle the load. Because you often have several VMs running on the same system the IO load will be more mixed than when running directly on a physical host.

What virtualization product are you planning to use? On what hw? What kind of hosts and services will you be monitoring? At what frequency?

Lars
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Hugh FraserConsultantCommented:
A machine with 105 hosts and a handful of services on each host never goes between 95% idle (standard desktop with 1g of memory). It's using 5 minute polling interval, ramping up to 1 minute polling for failed hosts/services. Disk I/O is minimal.

This is a normal out-of-the-box Fedora Core 8 and Nagios installation. I would expect that unless you are planning on developing some CPU/Disk intensive custom plugins to test particular services, it will perform just fine on a modest VM monitoring 150 nodes.
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