Solved

Debugging IIS Authentication

Posted on 2008-10-20
3
1,142 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-05
Hello,

I have a new installation of Win 2003 with IIS 6. I have setup a site to use Integrated Windows Authentication in the same way that I have on all of our previous servers. I have turned off anonymous access, and have ensured that the users i want to access the website have the relevant permissions on the home directory of the website.

Below are the events:

- If i am logged onto the server and run the Auth Diagnostics tool and supply my credentials a status of 200/Ok is returned.
- If i am logged onto the server and access the website through IE and again supply my credentials i am granted access however my colleague who has exactly the same permissions as me is not granted access
- If i access the website from my own PC using IE my credentials are not accepted whatsoever
- If i access the website from my own PC using Firefox my details are accepted

I don't know where to start looking for the problem as there doesnt seem to be any pattern. Is there anyway of monitoring IIS to discover more about wht exactly is going on behind the scenes?

Regards,
Al
0
Comment
Question by:partnershipdev
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 2
3 Comments
 
LVL 34

Expert Comment

by:Dave_Dietz
ID: 22764948
Try running the following command and see if it changes the behavior:

cscript c:\inetpub\adminscripts\adsutil.vbs set w3svc/ntauthenticationproviders NTLM

Dave Dietz
0
 

Author Comment

by:partnershipdev
ID: 22766432
Hi Dave,

That code did not seem to make any difference - i was still not granted access. However it lead me to looking at the following kb, http://support.microsoft.com/kb/871179, which details setting an servicePrincipalName on the account that the application pool is running under.

Integrated authentication is now working, but the kb doesnt explain enough about why it is now working. What does setting a servicePrincipalName do? The article would suggest that setting this flag within AD enables IIS Authentication to communicate using Kerberos?

Can you offer any insight?

Thanks
Al
0
 
LVL 34

Accepted Solution

by:
Dave_Dietz earned 500 total points
ID: 22769491
The servicePrincipalname, or SPN, is effectively a named endpoint that AD can use as an origin or destination for Kerberos authentication.  If you try to request a Kerberos ticket for an endpoint that AD doesn't know about Kerberos will fail.  Worse yet, if you ask for one it does know about (a machine name) and then hand that ticket to a process running under a different context (worker process running and a non-system account) it will not be able to read the ticket properly and authentication will fail.

The reason it worked on the server itself is that since you were makign a request to the same machine it used NTLM rather than Kerberos - you will not use Kerberos when making a request that doesn't make it out to the wire.

Dave Dietz
0

Featured Post

U.S. Department of Agriculture and Acronis Access

With the new era of mobile computing, smartphones and tablets, wireless communications and cloud services, the USDA sought to take advantage of a mobilized workforce and the blurring lines between personal and corporate computing resources.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

On July 14th 2015, Windows Server 2003 will become End of Support, leaving hundreds of thousands of servers around the world that still run this 12 year old operating system vulnerable and potentially out of compliance in many organisations around t…
Lync server 2013 or Skype for business Backup Service Error ID 4049 – After File Share Migration
NetCrunch network monitor is a highly extensive platform for network monitoring and alert generation. In this video you'll see a live demo of NetCrunch with most notable features explained in a walk-through manner. You'll also get to know the philos…
Monitoring a network: why having a policy is the best policy? Michael Kulchisky, MCSE, MCSA, MCP, VTSP, VSP, CCSP outlines the enormous benefits of having a policy-based approach when monitoring medium and large networks. Software utilized in this v…

728 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question