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Increasing sending/receiving sizes for e-mails to 20 MB

Posted on 2008-10-21
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Last Modified: 2013-11-30
Some of the Company Managers are requesting to change the limit of the e-mails sent and received by our Exchange server from 10 MB to 20 MB.  I warned about performance issues, hard drive space, time to restore, mailbox sizes, etc but they want it done.  We have an Exchange 2003 Enterprise server and only have a T1.  We have FTP so any files that are above 10 MB we usually just use this method but the Managers do not want to.  I wanted to see how many people are sending/receiving 20 MB or above e-mail attachments and any issues they might have and how they overcome them?  
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Question by:regsamp
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by:sullivanr6
ID: 22768489
the easiest way is to open ESM (exchang system manager), expand global settings, right click "message delivery", click the "defaults" tab, and you can change sending/receiving sizes there...

with respect to knowing who is sending these large attachments you can use the "message tracking center" to determine who's sent what to where...
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by:sullivanr6
ID: 22768530
...one more place you can set message size;

"first admin group (you may have to enable this in the "view", "servers", "name of your server", "protocols", "smtp", right click your virtual server, then click the "messages" tab.

J
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by:regsamp
ID: 22768540
Are there Organizations with a T1 line on an Exchange 2003 server that are sending 20 MB files on average?  I would think that there would be corruption and performance issues so this is more or less a question of actual application of doing this?  
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by:sullivanr6
ID: 22768627
...all day long. Most everyone I know is using at least a 20mb attachment rule, some in a university environment use 50mb.

are your using a standard version of exchange,  if your are then keep in mind your edb file can't grow beyond 14GB... So that would really be your only defense to not implement a larger attachment policy. If you're using an enterprise version there's no reason why you shouldnt do this.

J
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i2q2 earned 250 total points
ID: 22769001
If the business requires then it must me provided. It all boils down to how much the business depends on the emails. To prevent misuse of this you could restrict certain type of music and video files and allow other types like pdf, doc etc.
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by:regsamp
ID: 22769203
We are using Exchange Enterprise 2003.  Which colleges are using 50 MB files?  The IT department of M.I.T limits their e-mail system to 10 MB.  Wouldn't 50 MB files crash an Exchange server on a T1 line?  
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by:sullivanr6
sullivanr6 earned 250 total points
ID: 22769341
optical sciences at UofA, College of engineering at UofA... but there not using a T1, its more like an OC12 connection :)

I find it hard to believe that MIT (on campus) uses anyting less than what my friends use at the UofA...

Crashing a T1??? you have no worries, it may hangup internet traffic while the file transfer is in progress, but the connection to your ISP will remain intact.
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by:regsamp
ID: 22769394
Well, with OC12 being the line then I can see getting that kind of size.  I was told MIT does not go over 10 MB on average according to a friend.  When I say crashing a T1, I mean hanging up the line and other issues listed below.  Are these not concerns of expanding the 10 MB limit?

"10MB is the standard limit for email attachments for good reason.
 Large attachments bloat Inboxes
Make mailbox corruption more likely,
takes longer to backup and restore,
performs poorer on slower WAN links and via VPN,
takes longer to process through delivery queues,
and is *very likely to be denied by an outside mail server who has a lower attachment size limit*.

This means it costs the company more money in disk capacity on the Exchange server, backup time, backup disk/tape capacity, downtime to restore the large InfoStore in a server loss, and bandwidth costs to transfer that email.  
Users should be using file servers (or at least workstation file shares) to transfer 10MB+ files to other employees and use an FTP site or similar service for external users."
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by:sullivanr6
ID: 22769540
..why don't you sell your managment on this then? keep in mind, you're supporting them, but you make a good argument. However, if they NEED to send large attachement, then that's what you have to do.
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Author Comment

by:regsamp
ID: 22769686
True, if they need to send large attachments then might have to do it but I try to suggest that is what FTP is for.  Well, some valid points, thank you.  
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