How can I optimize SQL Server 2005 Running in Hyper-V?

First off, I'm a SQL noob. My company uses an application called CCH ProFx Document, which uses a SQL backend. When it was first installed, it was running in VMWare Virtual Server. Approx. a month ago I converted the VMDK to Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V and the problems started happening. CCH claims its because I converted to Hyper-V. They think SQL is overwhelming the I/O path of Hyper-V. What can I do to find and correct any I/O problems I have? It's SQL 2005 Standard running on Windows Server Standard 2003, 4 GB of allocated RAM. The host is a Dell 2900 Dual Xeon Quad 2.5 Ghz w/ 8GB RAM. 3 15k 146GB SAS drives.
NetworkSolutionsAsked:
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randy_knightCommented:
SQL server in a VM is a bad idea in general.  The achilles heel of VM's is I/O, so I'm not surprised that you're having this issue.  That said, I know that in VMWare, you can map a physical drive to a virtual one so that you get the benefit of all the spindles.  Not sure about Hyper-V as I haven't messed with it.

Why the change to HyperV?
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NetworkSolutionsAuthor Commented:
We're were in VM Server 1.6 that had memory limitations. Hyper-V gives us more flexibilty.
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randy_knightCommented:
My stance has always been and will continue to be "no SQL Server on VM".  You might have better luck in the Server 2008 forum.
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kollenhCommented:
I've run SQL Server 2005 inside Hyper-V without any issues.
Optimizing a virtualized SQL box isn't much different than a physical, as it's all about I/O.  What I've done is setup three separate virtual disks for the SQL box - one for OS, one for trans logs, one for database.  Make sure all are connected via a SCSI controller and if possible, create each virtual disk on separate physical disks to leverage multiple bus speeds.
While not the best for a big, heavily utilized database server it works just fine for smaller, purpose-oriented dbs and development work.  If it ran fine under VMWare, it will run fine under Hyper-V.
Let me know if you get stuck making the specific changes.
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NetworkSolutionsAuthor Commented:
I came across a similar recommendation somewhere else as well. Since you're the only one to respond with a constructive suggestion, I'll award you the points. Thanks.
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