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Query running slower on 2005 than 2000

Posted on 2008-10-21
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
I have SQL 2000 and SQL 2005 running on the same (Dev) server. The attached query will run in 5 secs on 2000 and 3:54 on SQL 2005 - Same DB restored from backup.

Worse still it takes 15minutes on Production.

What have I missed?



SELECT o.OrderDate, o.OrderRef, c.ClientCode, oi.Quantity, sno.Snos
FROM tblOrders o
	INNER JOIN tblOrderItems oi ON o.OrderID = oi.OrderID
	INNER JOIN (
		SELECT CatID, ClientCode FROM tblCatalogue WHERE TrackSerialNumbers = 1
		) c ON oi.CatID = c.CatID 
	INNER JOIN (
		SELECT a.OrderID, s.CatID, COUNT(s.SerialNumber) AS Snos
			FROM tblSerialNumbers s 
			INNER JOIN tblAirwayBills a ON s.AirwayBillID = a.AirwayBillID
			GROUP BY OrderID, CatID
	) sno ON o.OrderID = sno.OrderID AND sno.CatID = oi.CatID
WHERE o.OrderID > 184876
AND (oi.Quantity <> sno.Snos)
Order By o.OrderID Desc

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Question by:mdalemail
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Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3] earned 150 total points
ID: 22771860
after restore, you need to
? update statistics
? check the execution plan of the query

-> is the hardware specs the same on both machines? I guess the "old" machine was single-cpu, and the new one multi-cpu?
try to append this to your query.
OPTION (MAXDOP 1)
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by:BrandonGalderisi
BrandonGalderisi earned 300 total points
ID: 22771867
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by:mdalemail
ID: 22771973
Thanks for the posts - I'll have a look.
One bizarre twist - if I change the WHERE clause to search for o.OrderID > 172666 instead of 184876, which of course brings back a greater results set, the query takes 1 second!
What may be relevant is that this takes the Query back to include records created prior to the uupgrade to 2005.

Any thoughts?
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Assisted Solution

by:BrandonGalderisi
BrandonGalderisi earned 300 total points
ID: 22771982
Indexes.  When you copied your DB over did you create an indexing maintenance plan?
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Author Comment

by:mdalemail
ID: 22772002
Hmmm. No.
I guess I should re-rate myself to beginner.
So... Indexing maintenance plans. Any good links?
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Author Comment

by:mdalemail
ID: 22772061
Should I be Reorganising or Reindexing?
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Author Comment

by:mdalemail
ID: 22772237
Disgusted Eh?
Thanks anyway - Ran a reorganise followed by rebuild - down to 8 seconds.

Better, but still not as good as when running from older files.
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Expert Comment

by:BrandonGalderisi
ID: 22772850
Not abandoned, just traveling home from work.

SSMS (management studio) should have a pretty good wizard mode for creating an indexing maintenance plan.
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by:Anthony Perkins
Anthony Perkins earned 50 total points
ID: 22782509
Don't make the assumption that what ran fine in SQL Server 2000 will work as well in 2005.  Sometimes queries will not even run.  Every query needs to be inspected.  In my experience, the queries that did not execute as well or failed to compile were using lousy code and should be re-written in any case.  Your miles may vary.
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by:BrandonGalderisi
BrandonGalderisi earned 300 total points
ID: 22782767
but 4 minutes to 8 seconds after a a defrag is a smoking gun to at least EQUALIZE performance based upon environment, not optimization.  

That sounds confusing.  So I guess what I'm saying is that getting it from 4 minutes to 8 seconds, when it took 5 before, is probably as good as it's going to get WITHOUT rewriting the process.  So many things change from version to version that make certain things faster.  I swear that M$ must put in speedbumps to functionality when they don't want you using it any more.

And by speedbump I mean something that serves no purpose other than slowing something down.
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