Help with Microsoft Exchange on Windows Small Business Server 2003

Hi,

I know there is a plethora of info on this site, BUT I couldn't find a direct post that helped me answer my question:

- I have Windows Server 2003 that is active and running. Our entire company of 24 users log into Terminal Server and work on the server daily.
- I am trying to set up outlook to share calendars and also sync these calendars with our techs in the fields via their mobile phones.
- In order for Outlook to share Calendars, I understand I have to use MS EXCHANGE SERVER
- I already had purchased SMALL BUSINESS SERVER 2003 but learned it couldn't do Terminal Server so I went out and purchased Windows Server 2003 and have been using it ever since.
- I have a second server that is currently not being used and I am thinking about installing SBS 2003 in order to use Exchange Server to allow calendar sharing...etc.

Here are my questions:

1. Can I have two servers running successfully together that are SBS 2003 and Windows Server 2003?
2. I have all the users and security groups and everything working perfectly in Windows Server 2003. If I deicide to use SBS 2003 for Exchange Server, do I need to re-create all these users?
3. Should I just purchase EXCHANGE SERVER 2003 and install it on my Windows Server 2003 instead of fooling around with SBS2003?

Thanks!!!

Jason
jasonagsAsked:
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Don S.Commented:
1) yes.  The 2003 server would be a member server joined to the SBS domain.
2) You will need to either manually recreate your users and rejoin your computers to the new SBS domain, or migrate the current users and computers to the new SBS domain using ADMT or a third party tool. Personally, for 24 users, I would opt for manually entering the users and computer into the new SBS domain using the built in new user and new computer tools.
3) If you want to keep things exactly the way they are and don't mind the extra $$ to buy Exchange server and Exchange CALs and don't want or need to take advantage of all the management and remote access features of SBS, then yes you could just buy Exchange.  But remember, best practice is to install Exchange on it's own server that is not a domain controller and especially is not a terminal server.
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tntmaxCommented:
Actually, if you do a fresh install of the SBS server, you can join it to the existing domain, then migrate the 5 FSMO roles over to the SBS server. This saves you from manually migrating the users by hand to the new domain.

http://www.petri.co.il/transferring_fsmo_roles.htm

SBS is a much different beast than regular server, and requires doing things it's own special way. For that few users, it probably won't be a problem, but like dons said, Exchange on DC/TS is not ideal.
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