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What sequences of characters can be used in MICROSOFT JET SQL as names of tables and columns.

Posted on 2008-10-22
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
Please give me a URL of a page where I can find a formal criterion that helps me determine if the string can or cannot be used instead of <<NAME>> placeholders in here:
SELECT <<NAME>> as <<NAME>> FROM <<NAME>> as <<NAME>>

I am talking about MS JET SQL.

Thanks,
--Igor
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Question by:midfde
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by:Patrick Matthews
ID: 22780321
Igor,

It really does not have to be hard: use only letters, numbers, and underscores.  Some Experts even eschew
underscores.  Further, avoid reserved words: SELECT, UPDATE, Date, Format, any of the key commands
in SQL or names of functions.

Patrick
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Expert Comment

by:Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)
ID: 22780323
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Author Comment

by:midfde
ID: 22780476
OK, I know that the following strings CAN be used as object names:
[Select], [My table], [Include?]
I am not sure about a name with the length, say, 500 characters; or about
__table_name__
and so on.
My program has to determine if a string will be later accepted by JET engine. It (the program) just wants to follow a set of "formal" rules to be able to point user to a right direction to meet these rules.
Please try to help me one more time. (The list of key words looks irrelevant to the issue).
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by:Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)
ID: 22780537
from the Access window click Help
type specification in the box

click on Access Specifications
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by:midfde
ID: 22780718
Looks closer to what I need. It's at least a document to refer to. But it's not exactly what I am looking for:
Please see the title of my question. It implies more than just max length.
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Expert Comment

by:Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)
ID: 22780826
be more explicit
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Author Comment

by:midfde
ID: 22780993

capricorn1, specifications you are referring to instruct me that max length of the name is 64.
It does not say whether the following sequences of character are valid sql names:
SELECT
      ["How are you doing?" - John asked]
FROM [I am all right. Thanks.]  
ORDER BY [order by]
And I am looking for a document that explicitly states what... see the title of my question.
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Accepted Solution

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Rey Obrero (Capricorn1) earned 500 total points
ID: 22781125
from the same help file type naming objects
then select
Guidelines for naming fields, controls, and objects
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by:GRayL
ID: 22781143
Have a look at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189822.aspx for reserved words.  There is such a wide variety of naming conventions it is probably best to Google - MS SQL naming conventions.
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Author Closing Comment

by:midfde
ID: 31508918


Yes, thanks, it is the best answer although it's not exactly what the rules should be. This however is a usual blunder of MS, not of yours, capricorn1.

The rewarded answer is http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/access/HP051867691033.aspx 
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