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Lost Bios Password for Fujitsu-Siemens Lifebook E8310

Posted on 2008-10-23
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Last Modified: 2009-07-29
Re: Fujitsu-Siemens Lifebook E series Model E8310.

One of my client has obtained the above laptop as part of a foreclosure agreement on a bad loan but since it has a bios password (Phoenix Technologies - Trust Core), they cannot access it for system restoration.

I have tried removing the CMOS battery for a few minutes and several bios passwords such as BIOS, CMOS, PHOENIX, phoenix but to no avail.

I believe there is a way to short some pins or jumpers but I am not sure. Does anyone know a way?
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Question by:Emax_Solutions
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rindi earned 1000 total points
ID: 22786634
Modern Laptops use a security chip to store BIOS passwords. Your option is to either get the Password from the original owner, or get in touch with Fujitsu Siemens, provide them proof of ownership, and then they'll remove the Password for you. This can also mean you will have to send it in to them, as they may need physical access to it, and it probably won't be a free service either.
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by:Mark
Mark earned 1000 total points
ID: 22786661
The CMOS battery removal is for older laptops, not newer ones like this, which usually have a security chip which is independant of the CMOS battery.
The only suggestion I can give is to call Fujitsu seimens and give proof of ownership. Perhaps they have a backdoor password.
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by:Emax_Solutions
ID: 22794414
Thanks for your suggestions:

1. I can't send it in to Fujitsu because we are based in Tanzania and do not have a local support center for F/Siemens. The nearest service center would be in South Africa and the courier cost would be outrageous + plus cost of reseting (its not free) would be ridiculous. It would be cheaper to purchase a new Laptop.

2. I can try emailing Fujitsu support but establishing proof of ownership would be a problem as we do not have original invoices of purchase, but we do have a loan agreement and a certified foreclosure ruling. I do not believe this would count.

3. I have previously successfully reset passwords on Dell C600's by shorting pins on a chip on the main-board. If anyone knows a similar procedure for the E8310, it would certainly help revive an otherwise useless laptop.
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LVL 88

Expert Comment

by:rindi
ID: 22794527
With today's notebooks there is no other option than to get the help of the manufacturer if you can't get the original password from the previous owner. This makes sense as like this it will be almost impossible for thiefs to use the laptop, and laptops can get stolen pretty easily because of their size and mobility.

The loan agreement should probably be good enough as proof of ownership, but you'd have to get in touch with fujitsu siemens anyway. Some laptop companies can calculate a master password for that specific laptop based on it's serial number, so it might not be necessary to send it in, you'd have to find out by calling them.

You might be able to get a mainboard for the PC, that would be another option.
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Author Comment

by:Emax_Solutions
ID: 22794803
I clearly understand the need for security and advise my clients to always keep a good BIOS password - this way even if the hard drive is replace, it still makes the laptop inaccessible for thieves. I will give Fujitsu a try and report any progress here.
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Expert Comment

by:Kelvin_King
ID: 22921020
You mentioned that you removed the CMOS battery for only a few minutes.

Apprently, the CMOS can retain it's charge for as much as a few days without the battery.

Here's what I read:

Clear the CMOS (remove the CMOS battery until POST displays a "CMOS checksum bad" or a similar message);

Hope that helps.
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