extract ip addresses from any file.

I need to extract ip addresses from an unformatted text file.  The addresses do not have brackets or any other delimiters around them.  I need to output this to another file.
jeffsmallAsked:
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LosBearCommented:
is the file tab delimited at least? can you provide a sample of the file you want to parse?

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WANMCommented:
assuming they at least have a space at each side of the address, and one address somewhere on each line:

cat file | sed -r 's/(.*?) ([0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}) (.*)/\2/'

If you could provide and example of the file it would make this easier....
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jeffsmallAuthor Commented:
Sorry, I want this to work on just about any text file and there may or may not be spaces around the address.  The addresses might be interspersed and there could be more than one on a line.

Here is some sample text

; generated by /sbin/dhclient-script
nameserver 192.168.1.147
nameserver 192.168.1.1
ip address=192.168.1.148
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jeffsmallAuthor Commented:
search aus.us.siteprotect.com
nameserver 216.139.253.2
nameserver 216.139.253.3

the regex provided above matches the first line also.  I just need to pull the ip addresses and output them to a temp file.

>cat /etc/resolv.conf | sed -r 's/(.*?) ([0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}) (.*)/\2/'
search aus.us.siteprotect.com
nameserver 216.139.253.2
nameserver 216.139.253.3
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zmoCommented:
well to remove those lines you can do :

% cat /etc/resolv.conf | grep -E '[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}'
nameserver 216.139.253.2
nameserver 216.139.253.3

but if you join both you'll still get :
% cat /etc/resolv.conf | grep -E '[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}' | sed -r 's/(.*?) ([0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}) (.*)/\2/'
nameserver 216.139.253.2
nameserver 216.139.253.3

and that's because of the needed ' ' between the regexp and the rest of the line.

A fix would be :
% cat /etc/resolv.conf | sed -r 's/^.* ([0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}).*$/\1/' | grep -E '[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}'
216.139.253.2
216.139.253.3

but you just can't match several IPs on the same line, because of how sed works internally (that's fun I said the same thing this morning on another topic about regexps). Sed works with finite stack automatas, which means it can't produce n times the same pattern in a s///. You have to do it programatically.

A solution would be to get all the first IPs of every lines containing IPs. Then use sed to remove all those IPs and pipe it to sed again so it gets all the first IPs of every lines, and so on until there are no more IPs.
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zmoCommented:
% cat /etc/resolv.conf | sed -r 's/^[^0-9]*([0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}).*$/\1/' | grep -E '[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}'
216.139.253.2
216.139.253.3

is what you want (ie no need for leading white space)
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jeffsmallAuthor Commented:
Thank you!  That does what I need very nicely. I appreciate your help and the knowledge I have gained from your work.
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zmoCommented:
to be more picky, and correct all previous mistakes, you could use :

% cat /etc/resolv.conf | sed -r 's/^.*?[^0-9](25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)[^0-9].*$/\1.\2.\3.\4/' | grep -E "(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)"
216.139.253.2
216.139.253.3

the differences are :
1/ '' ^.*? '' : matches any character any time at the beginning of the line
2/ '' [^0-9] '' : match any character that is not a number one time
3/ '' (25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?) '' : matches an IP address that is valid (ie 265.24.256.3 is not valid)
4/ '' [^0-9] '' same as 2
5/ '' .*?$ '' : same as 1/ for the end

\1.\2.\3.\4 reconstructs the address from the parts in parenthesis in pattern 3/
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