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Re-allocation of disk space on SUN Solaris 10

Posted on 2008-10-24
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Last Modified: 2013-12-01
Currently we have the following file systems on the sun system.

Filesystem                  size    used   avail     capacity        mounted on
/dev/dsk/c0t0d0s3      4.3G   3.9G   391M    92%              /usr
/dev/dsk/c0t2d0s1       37G    25G    12G    69%               /usr2

We need to increase the disk space in /usr. Is it possible to re-allocate the disk space from /usr2 which has 12GB available? and whether it can be done by the internal team rather than SUN support.

Version : SUN Solaris 10

Thanks in advance.
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Question by:d_lalit
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Expert Comment

by:yuzh
ID: 22801288
If you have someone with enough experiences with Unix,  you can do it by yourself.
Since /usr and /usr2 are sitting in two different hard drive, if you don't want to resize both
disk (which required t back up all data in c0t0d0 and c0t2d0), you can use "ln" to borrow some disk space from /usr2.
eg:
if you want use use disk space for /usr/local, you can do:
# transfer the data from /usr to /usr2
cd /usr
tar cf - local | (cd /usr2 ; tar xf -)
# remove local in /usr
rm -rf  /usr/local
# borrow the disk space from /usr2 use "ln"
ln -s  /usr2/local /usr/local
after the about actions, all your data for /usr/local is using the disk space in /usr2 (/dev/dsk/c0t2d0s1).

 
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Expert Comment

by:Saranyakkali
ID: 22806563
no you cont, once it created with file system for usr2 and it is that possible with Veritas only.

Thanks
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Accepted Solution

by:
yuzh earned 100 total points
ID: 22810216
You can also add another HD to the box and use part of the new drive as /usr, partion the new hard drive, (and run newfs to create a new UFS fileststem to the partition, tansfer all the data in /usr to the new HD (usfdump/ufsrestore), change the mount point in /etc/vfstab to use the new hard drive.  Or you can partion  the
new hard drive with the same number of partitin as c0t0d0 (make the partition size as the way to wanted) ufsdump/ufsrestore the data from c0t0d0 to the new drivepertition by partition, the run installboot to the new HD, shutdown the box and power off. take the old c0t0d0 out and move the new drive to the c0t0d0 position.
power it back on.  you system will have a better layout for c0t0d0.
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