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How do you determine what directories live in what volume when you view the Logical Volume Management program?

Posted on 2008-10-24
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I have a VOLGroup 00 Physical View defined as follows:
/dev/cciss/c0d0p2
/dev/cciss/c0d0p1
/dev/ccisss/c0d2p1
/dev/cciss/c1d0p1

The Logical View is defined as
VolGroup 00
LogVol00
LogVol01

How do I determine where my files actually live.  I have a /u/master1/data and a /u/master2/data and other directories that I need to understand where they live.  Can someone show me how to determine this information?
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Question by:kwh3856
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9 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:fosiul01
ID: 22799045
when you have setup your partition
you must of did this

LogVol00 for /var
logVol01 for /home

is not it ??

if you do df -h
what do you  see ??
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Author Comment

by:kwh3856
ID: 22823996
fosiul01,
I will check this tomorrow and let you know.  Thank you very much for your reply.

thanks
kenny
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Author Comment

by:kwh3856
ID: 22834255
[root@123]# df -h
Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00             528G   11G  491G   3% /
/dev/cciss/c0d0p1                                             99M   13M   81M  14%  /boot
tmpfs                                                                     5.9G     0  5.9G   0%     /dev/shm
[root@123]#

This is what I get.

Is there a way to divide the VolGroup00 into seperate volume and then create directories on those volumes?


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LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:fosiul01
ID: 22834635
ok what happended here is:
when you installed your OS, you chose to use lvm for everything.

so currently /var,/home/ and other directory is in one logical volume.

what i do is always:
i put /var,/home,/usr  in different volume so it would be like this

/dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00             528G   11G  491G   3% /
/dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol01             528G   11G  491G   3% /
/dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol02             528G   11G  491G   3% /
/dev/cciss/c0d0p1                                             99M   13M   81M  14%  /boot
tmpfs

benefits is: if suppose /home is require more space, i will just add another hardrive or if there is any emptry space in other logical volume, i will use that one and extend /home logical volume .

now your problem is, everything is in One logical volume

now you can create other volume as well , but do you have any extra space in your physical volume??
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Author Comment

by:kwh3856
ID: 22834689
No.  I used all the space when I installed the system.  Is there any drawbacks to this configuration?  I currently have 12 drives in my system.  It seems that every thing is spread out across those drive which would give me I belive that best performance.  If I am not worried about space, this it should not be a big deal.  Is that correct?

Thanks
Kenny

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Accepted Solution

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fosiul01 earned 500 total points
ID: 22834741
ok you are using Scsi hardrive is not it ??

technicaly there is no draw backs of this configuraiton.
benefits is : if any drive needs extra space its will increase automatically within the logical volume. if you are running out of space just increase your dirves and increase your logical volumes


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Author Comment

by:kwh3856
ID: 22834776
That is excactly what I needed to know.  Thank you very much.
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LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:fosiul01
ID: 22834801
you are welcome
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Author Closing Comment

by:kwh3856
ID: 31509776
Thank you very much.

Thanks
Kenny
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