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when running mpstat or vmstat in solaris, sys is using the cpu alot more than usr.  How can I find out what the system is doing and why it is hogging up the resources, slowing the system down.

Posted on 2008-10-24
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I am running SQL Remote Sybase replication process on Solaris 10.  The hardware is a V880 with 8CPU and 32GB memory.  WHen the process gets to "writetext", mpstat shows that sys is using more of the cpu than usr, and the server is very slow, even to type simple commands.  How can I tell what the sys is doing?  Any ideas how I can track this?
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Question by:Blademonkey
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jgiordano earned 500 total points
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Did you try using truss?

Or even dtrace since it is solaris 10?

here are some dtrace tools http://www.brendangregg.com/dtrace.html#Scripts

this dtrace script might be helpful - http://www.brendangregg.com/DTrace/lostcpu.html

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by:Blademonkey
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Thank you very much!!
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by:grant300
ID: 22805030
Writetext usually means it is stuffing CLOBs or BLOBs into the database.  If you do not have any BLOBs or CLOBs in your schema, you can tune out now since this cannot be the problem.  The SYS time is all the driver level activity trying to get things to disk.  On Linux, you can see this as a bunch of I/O wait time.

Solaris is a very conservative operating system which is good for enterprise applications.  Unfortunately, it does some things in the name of stability that are not particularly helpful for database performance.  One of those is to, by default, turn off on-disk write caching.  This has an inordinately high impact on disk write performance, particularly for long sequential I/Os like file copies and continuous database writes to disk.

Fortunately, you can turn on-disk (the controller board bolted to the disk drive itself) caching at the Solaris driver level.  I don't recall the specifics but I have lived this problem before and the results are like night and day.  Definitely worth the time to track down the method for doing this.

BTW, ASE 12.5 was not all that stable.  v12.5.1 is the earliest release I would recommend.

Regards,
Bill
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