Does the HP Procurve 2124 switch support teaming and if so, how do you configure it.

Hi,

Got a HP 2124 Procurve switch thats plugged into a server running a teamed pair of network cards.  THe servers error log is reporting constant connection/disconnection of one of the NICs, so I dont think the switch has been setup properly.

Seems to be quite old and there's no manual around (and I cant get one from the link on the HP site).

Does it support teaming?  If so how?  (I think it;s an unmanaged switch).  
Many thanks
jmsjmsAsked:
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jburgaardCommented:
It is a unmanaged switch.
It does not support teaming.

As stated page 30 in:
ftp://ftp.hp.com/pub/networking/software/j4868001.pdf
"..In addition, you should make sure that your network topology contains
no data path loops. Between any two end nodes, there should be only
one active cabling path at any time. Data path loops will cause broadcast
storms that will severely impact your network performance."
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MysidiaCommented:
The switch does not have support for link aggregation.

There are some types of teaming you can use with such switches, but not the types that require switch support for link aggregation.

The most common type of teaming you may use without switch support is  an active/backup  configuration;  where the second interface originates traffic only when the primary has failed.

There are some active/active configurations you can use, subject to limitations.
The most reliable (but least useful)  is to assign each interface a different  layer 3 IP address.

Traffic destined for  interface 1's IP  arrives at /  is sent from interface 1, etc.
For the configuration to be redundant, you need to somehow redirect traffic to the other PC interface if the first fails.


On a Linux system this configuration may indeed be redundant,  if you do not have  rpf_filter  (reverse path forwarding filter) enabled.

In case rpf_filter is disabled,  traffic for any host IP may be received from any interface.

New outbound connections may bind any interface also  for outbound traffic






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jmsjmsAuthor Commented:
Thanks to both of you for your responses.

Mysidia,

The most common type of teaming you may use without switch support is  an active/backup  configuration;  where the second interface originates traffic only when the primary has failed.

DO you mean have one NIC disabled, and manually enable it if the enabled one fails?
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jmsjmsAuthor Commented:
Mysida,

Any comment?  I'd like to close the question.  Many thanks J
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