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Raid 10 Storage - How much does it recognize

Posted on 2008-10-28
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I want to use Debian 4.0 with Raid 10.  How much storage will it recognize?  We have 3 TB altogether but with the Raid 10, it will need to be able to see 1.5 TB.  Can it handle this?
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Question by:alishad
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by:PeturIngiEgilsson
ID: 22820807
I've used a 1.2 TB RAID5 with debian... worked like a charm
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PeturIngiEgilsson earned 63 total points
ID: 22820823
It will depend on the filesystem you choose.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ext3
Size limits

ext3 has a maximum size for both individual files and the entire filesystem. For the filesystem as a whole that limit is 2311 blocks. Both limits are dependent on the block size of the filesystem; the following chart summarizes the limits[15]:
Block size       Max file size       Max filesystem size
1KiB       16GiB       <2TiB
2KiB       256GiB       <4TiB
4KiB       2TiB       <8TiB
8KiB[limits 1]       2TiB       <16TiB
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by:gurutc
gurutc earned 62 total points
ID: 22821181
I'm running a 1.8 TB RAID 10 on two Dell Powervault 220 External Array cases no problem with Debian.

- gurutc
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