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Can an intruder penetrate my firewall?

Posted on 2008-10-28
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
Our firewall has several log entries similar to this::
Possible port scan dropped      
Source:203.149.62.175, 80, WAN      
Destination:202.57.149.114, 40204, WAN
TCP scanned port list: 40176, 40176, 40176, 40176, 40176

The IT manager at that office has interpreted these to mean the following:
" In the log you can see the same connection type being dropped with the same external IP but different port numbers... when you see this multiple times within a very quick time span and the only thing that changes is the port number (in sequence) then you know someone is trying to scan your ports and attack you.
When you see internal IPs that are not from your subnet, they can only be external. If this is happening, it is most likely IP spoofing which is when someone floods a legitimate IP with so much data that it crashes and at the same time they impersonate your IP and the server doesn't know the difference. At this point, they can do pretty much anything because you were most probably already logged on. What ever privileges the user "had" are now the impersonators."

Is his assessment correct?  Does this mean a hacker is trying to get in?  Will the firewall stop them?  If not, how do we protect ourselves?
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Question by:captainrichard
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by:cuziyq
ID: 22823321
IP spoofing, port scanning, and denial-of-service attacks are among the oldest tricks in the book.  Any firewall that's worth spending money on can easily deal with these kinds of things.

The log entry you noted was notification that the firewall was doing its job.  It detected a possible port scan attempt and dropped that connection.

Is a hacker trying to get in?  Probably.  Even an obscure company with a public web site can expect to have a break-in attempt several times a year.  The more high-profile your company, the more attacks you see.  Google gets attacked literally millions of times a year.

Will the firewall stop them?  Maybe, maybe not.  Depends on a lot of factors, but the competence of your IT security staff is a much bigger factor than your choice of firewall.

How do you protect yourself?  Any web site is basically a analogous to a store in a shopping mall.  They see thousands of people passing by each day, and it's a statistical certainty that some of them are going to be shoplifters and vandals.  It's just a fact of life.  Vigilance is your best defense.  I would recommend reading some books about network security best practices.
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jahboite earned 500 total points
ID: 22830336
The example log entry doesn't look like a port scan to me.
It looks like someone behind the public interface at 202.57... was browsing the web at www.siamsport.co.th and the firewall is reporting the ports mapped to the internal user.  I believe this kind of thing happens when one closes a web-browser or navigates away from a page that is currently loading.

A port scan is not an attack.  It's just an attempt to enumerate services available via the scanned interface.

Your IT managers assessment doesn't directly apply to the log entry you provided here so I can't really comment on its accuracy - save to say that the kind of impersonation using resource exhaustion and IP spoofing is not really applicable with todays technologies.

Hope that helps a bit.
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