Spare Parts Policy?

Does anyone have any links to resources discussing best practices for implementing a Hardware Reserve Policy?

I'm talking about things like:

Fully imaged workstations, Blackberries, Mice, Keyboards, monitors, cables, memory, hard disks, graphics cards etc.

Is there such a thing as maintaining a X% reserve level for each part?

Thanks in advance
AbbeyCapitalAsked:
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RowleyCommented:
The calculation you need to make is one of cost/downtime/impact and opportunity cost. How much will part X cost you if unavailable for X time? If a users mouse fails, is it critical? It might be if that user is a trader for example.

Same could be said of a disk. If you lose one disk in a RAID set, for how long are you prepared to run the risk of catastrophic failure? Could you afford to wait 2 days for a part to ship? What if the second disk fails? How much time, effort and lost revenue would 1 hour, 1 day, or 1 weeks downtime cost? What impact would this failure have?

The opportunity cost might reasonably be considered to be mainly monetary.

So in my humble opinion, there is no hard and fast rule. You need to analyse the needs of your business/users/whatever and make decisions based on your needs.

hth.
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TwisteddkCommented:
I agree with Rowley in terms of "local" support. However, if you're a reatiler, I usually recommend that you keep at least 1 of everything in stock that you'd normally sell within a normal month. However, once the part becomes obsolete you should aim at replacing with recent parts, so as to not clutter up your storage with oboslete parts. Even if you get a replacement from the manufacturer a month or two later, you can just sell these discounted, or simply write them off.
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