Confeguring clients and DHCP servers when using subnetting

Hi

when i use subnetting is there any special configuration i should do to dhcp server and clients ? or i just put the range and mask such as 255.255.224.0 on the dhcp server and its done ?
Pure_HeartAsked:
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PatricckCommented:
Hi,
the answer for your question:
http://linuxgazette.net/issue83/ward.html
;)
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Toni UranjekConsultant/TrainerCommented:
Hi!

You sholud exclude IP addresses for servers from address pool to avoid IP conflicts. Subnet mask should be the same as the subnet mask of your DHCP server if server and clients are on the same local network.

HTH

Toni
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
You are *always* using subnetting - in the sense that there is a particular subnet mask in use .. which there always is.

So, yes that's all you have to do - subject to what "toniur" mentions.  The range of addresses for DHCP is almost ALWAYS a subset of the mask range.

Example:

Subnet: 192.168.1.0 / 255.255.255.0 meaning host addresses 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.254.
Assuming that some devices / hosts will be on fixed IPs, then you will want to reserve a range for them.  
Let's say that some are at the bottom of the range using: 192.168.1.1 to .20
Let's say that some are at the top of the range using: 192.168.1.235 to .254
So, the DHCP range then should be limited to some or all of the range 192.168.1.21 to 192.168.1.234 depending on your needs and desires.  

DHCP can't help you manage overlaps - that's why you do this.
For example:
Computer #1 has a fixed IP address of 192.168.1.13.
DHCP range is set for 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.254.
Computer #1 is shut down for a week for some reason (maybe it's a laptop even - although one would not as normally assign a fixed IP to a laptop .. but you get the idea I'm sure)
DHCP assigns 192.168.1.13 to another computer/device during that time.
Then, Computer #1 comes back on line and there is an IP address conflict!!!
That's why the range "partitions" need to be defined and managed.



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