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Microsoft, Windows Server, 2003, Routing 2 network cards

I have 2 disjointed networks 10.0.0.x and 192.168.0.x on my server. I am running Terminal Server on this box. The local users run off 10.0.0.x and have an internet connection via a local dsl router on 10.0.0.254 This is the default gateway setup on this nic.
I have remote users who come in via another dsl router 192.168.0.254 but cannot get a connection to the Terminal Server. If I remove the gateway from the first card 10.0.0.254 and put in the gateway 192.168.0.254 in to the second nic I get a connection.
My Question is can I somehow have 2 gateways for 2 different networks on the same server or is there a route I can add to make this work.
I have tried adding a static route and installing RRAS but to no avail
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dbsltd
Asked:
dbsltd
4 Solutions
 
Rob WilliamsCommented:
No, you cannot have two default gateways.

With the current configuration, the problem is the packets from the terminal server users are received by the server, on 192.168.0.x, but returned to the default gateway, 10.0.0.254, and therefore lost.

In many cases you would simply add a static route but the terminal server user connections are coming form multiple IP's, or even any IP (I assume), so a general static route to route to any IP is defined as a default gateway which as stated you can only have one.

My recommendation would be to remove the default gateway from the LAN NIC (10.0.0.x) and add it to the TS NIC (192.168.0.x). This would allow the terminal server connections to work, as you have discovered, LAN users would still use the same 10.0.0.254 gateway, LAN connections to and from the server on the same subnet do not require a gateway, and the server would have to use the 192.168.0.254 as its internet access gateway, rather than 10.0.0.254

If that is not an acceptable alternative in your situation, the best bet would be to set up a VPN for the terminal server users which would then allow for routing of this specific traffic.
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65tdCommented:
Post ipconfig /all and route print from cmd prompt.
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dbsltdAuthor Commented:
If I were to put the 192.168.0.254 router onto the same ip range 10.0.0.0 could I use multiple gateways then because the are on the same ip range
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Rob WilliamsCommented:
You cannot use multiple gateways.
A gateway is a "Default gateway".
A route has to be defined for all traffic. By default traffic destined for the 10.0.0.0/24 subnet is sent to the server's 10.0.0.x NIC. Any traffic destined for the 192.168.0.0/24 subnet is sent to the server's 192.168.0.x NIC. You can also manually add other static routes for IP's or subnets and define the next hop.
However, all undefined IP's or subnets, such as the Internet, are sent to the default gateway. Thus there cannot be two, as there cannot be 2 defaults.
You can see these routes but entering at a command line   route print
The default gateway is the 0.0.0.0 route.
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giltjrCommented:
You need to be very careful with what you are doing and RobWill has you on the right track.

To go just a bit more on the "multiple default" issue, you can NEVER have more that one default, in anything not just routing/gateways.  You can only have 1 default, period.  Think about it, if you have two defaults, how do you know which default to take?  You don't you have to have 1 default and 1 "other" and you have to have something decide when to take the "other" option.  Again, this is not dealing with just routing, it is with anything where you can have more than one choice.

Which router (next hop) to forward traffic to is based on the destination IP address.  You only have one solution, but two different ways to implement that solution.

1) Keep the current default as is.  Get a list of ALL of the IP addresses the new users will be using and add them to the routing table to use the router on the 192.168.0.0/24.

2) Change the default route to point to the router on the 192.168.0.0/24 subnet.  Get a list of all of the IP addresses that you want to use the 10.0.0.0/24 subnet and add them to the routing table to use the router on the 10.0.0.0/24 subnet.  However, if you do this, that means any and all traffic that is NOT specifically sent via the 10.0.0.0/24 router, will go to the 192.168.0/24 router.  This includes ALL traffic that is generated by the host itself to go to the Internet.
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Rob WilliamsCommented:
Hi giltjr.  I agree 100% however I doubt either solution is practical.
1) perfect solution if terminal server users are all connecting from known static IP's, but I am doubtful
2) 'List of IP's to which users want to connect' ? That would be 1/2 the Internet i would think :-)

This is why i suggested; "remove the default gateway from the LAN NIC (10.0.0.x) and add one to the TS NIC (192.168.0.x). This would allow the terminal server connections to work, as you have discovered, LAN users would still use the same 10.0.0.254 gateway, LAN connections to and from the server on the same subnet do not require a gateway, and the server would have to use the 192.168.0.254 as its internet access gateway, rather than 10.0.0.254"
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giltjrCommented:
Opps, I missed the part about the "10.0.0.0/24" users all being local users.  I thought they were a group of users coming in from the other ADSL Internet connection.

Then you are correct, best thing to do is to change the terminal servers default gateway to the IP address of the router on the 192.168.0.0/24 subnet.
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Rob WilliamsCommented:
:-)  Wondered if you caught that. I am the one that usually misses those things.
Have a great day !
--Rob
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