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caling Store procdure

Posted on 2008-10-29
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
is this a correct way to calling a store procedure in vb.net? Or would you do it differently? Also, what if there are multple param ?



Dim sqlConn As SqlConnection = New SqlConnection(_connectionString)
sqlConn.Open()

Dim sqlComm As New SqlCommand("nameofstoreprocedure", sqlConn)
sqlComm.CommandType = Data.CommandType.StoredProcedure

Dim paramUser As SqlParameter = New SqlParameter("@myparam", Data.SqlDbType.VarChar, 3)
sqlComm.Parameters.Add(paramUser)
sqlComm.ExecuteNonQuery()
sqlConn.Close()
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Question by:VBdotnet2005
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Juan_Barrera earned 125 total points
ID: 22835211
Hi, this is the way I'd do it:

   Using sqlConn As New SqlConnection(_connectionString) 'Using statement to properly dispose the object
                Using sqlComm As New SqlCommand("nameofstoreprocedure", sqlConn)  'Using statement to properly dispose the object
                    sqlComm.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure
                    sqlComm.Parameters.AddWithValue("@myparam", "myvalue")
                    sqlConn.Open() 'Open the connection as late as possible
                    sqlComm.ExecuteNonQuery()
                    sqlConn.Close() 'And close it as soon as possible. 
                End Using
            End Using               'However, this closing the Using statement will close the connection anyway

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by:VBdotnet2005
ID: 22837908
I am very new with  "Using and end Using" Could you explain a benefit of using it?
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by:VBdotnet2005
ID: 22837912
I am glad you use that as a sample. I have seen a few use it but not sure why...
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by:Juan_Barrera
ID: 22837914
It's a not so simple topic, you should read the following link:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/htd05whh(VS.80).aspx
 
In you specific case, have a look at the fllowing paragraph:
"Sometimes your code requires an unmanaged resource, such as a file handle, a COM wrapper, or a SQL connection. A Using block guarantees the disposal of one or more such resources when your code is finished with them. This makes them available for other code to use.
Managed resources are disposed of by the .NET Framework garbage collector (GC) without any extra coding on your part. You do not need a Using block for managed resources. "

 
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by:VBdotnet2005
ID: 22837919
Also, is it necessary to use Try Catch block sqlConn.Open() ?
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by:Juan_Barrera
ID: 22837928
No, the using statement will take care of errors, unless you want to execute a piece of code if a particular exception happens. Then, you'll need a Try / Catch to do it.
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by:VBdotnet2005
ID: 22837943
according to the link you gave, it is really much like Try...Finally ... like ?

If you need finer control over the acquisition of the resources, or you need additional code in the Finally block, you can rewrite the Using block as a Try...Finally construction. The following example shows skeleton Try and Using constructions that are equivalent in the acquisition and disposal of resource.
Copy Code

            Using resource As New resourceType
    ' Insert code to work with resource.
End Using
' THE FOLLOWING TRY CONSTRUCTION IS EQUIVALENT TO THE USING BLOCK
Dim resource As New resourceType
Try
    ' Insert code to work with resource.
Catch ex As Exception
    ' Insert code to process exception.
Finally
    ' Insert code to do additional processing before disposing of resource.
    resource.Dispose()
End Try
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by:Juan_Barrera
ID: 22837953
Yes, it is like Try / Catch / Finally, except that, by using it, you make absolutely sure that an unmanaged resource, like your SqlConnection , is properly disposed.
By using only Try / Catch blocks,if written uncorrectly, there is that risk.
Besides, is easier and cleaner!
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by:VBdotnet2005
ID: 22837994
I just read about this Using statement too  http://www.pluralsight.com/community/blogs/fritz/archive/2005/04/28/7834.aspx  That makes alot more sense.... now  I thank you very much for your quick reply  :)
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