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Vista display settings and dxdiag still listing old video card after upgrade

Posted on 2008-10-30
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Last Modified: 2013-11-08
After recently upgrading my video card from an old radeon 9800 pro to an HD 3850 AGP, I noticed that my display settings and dxdiag both still show "Radeon 9800" instead of "HD 3850".

The odd thing is that the card itself is installed correctly and it's working just fine. In my device manager, it properly shows up as "HD 3800 Series". I'm on Vista 32bit, 3.2ghz P4 processor, 2gigs DDR400, Intel D865PERL mobo.

I've had this problem for ages now, and while it really isn't a major one, it's still rather annoying. Any help would be REALLY appreciated, as I've done practically everything I could think of (other than reformatting my computer, which is not an option for me at the moment).
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Question by:dec0y
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by:nobus
ID: 22840745
go to device manager>view and click "show hidden devices"
now delete your old video board
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by:dec0y
ID: 22846980
My old video card is not listed there, even with the show hidden devices enabled. As I stated in my original post, it only seems to show as the old video card in my display settings (where you change your resolution and such), and dxdiag. Everywhere else seems to show the proper new video card (HD 3850)
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by:nobus
ID: 22848130
did you uninstall all the software for the old card?
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by:dec0y
ID: 22848925
Yes, of course. And I used Driver Cleaner after that to make sure nothing was left.
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by:nobus
nobus earned 20 total points
ID: 22849049
then the DRive cleaner did not clean well  :-))
you can always try to delete any references to it it in the registry; here the steps
-in run box, type regedit
-under file, choose export, to save the current registry
-then search for radeon, or 9800, and delete those
-close regedit and reboot
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Author Comment

by:dec0y
ID: 22850531
I've actually tried that before and it caused my screen to be completely black even though the computer itself could run fine. I could hear it load up windows and everything. I wasn't getting a no-signal from my monitor either, it was just a black screen. So I had no choice except to restore the registry.
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by:nobus
ID: 22851168
then you removed too much i guess.
check well what you delete
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Author Comment

by:dec0y
ID: 22851219
Not much documentation on the specific registry keys that have radeon 9800 in them.
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dec0y earned 0 total points
ID: 22909441
Well, I found my own solution and I hope this might help anyone out there that has this strange peculiar problem:

Since I could clearly see in my registry that my old video card was still listed there, I found out there was a way to make Device Manager show you all the hardware that was ever installed on your computer, even if it's not currently installed.

1. Open CMD in Administrator Mode (If you don't open it in admin mode this WILL NOT WORK)

 2 Enter: set devmgr_show_nonpresent_devices=1

 3. Enter: start devmgmt.msc   (do not use compmgmt.msc)

4. In Device Manager, go to View --> Show Hidden Devices

Now you should be able to see all the hardware that was ever installed on your computer. In my case, I simply right clicked and pressed uninstall on my old video card that was listed there.

 
5. After you finish, make sure to reverse what you did and type: set devmgr_show_nonpresent_devices=0

Hope this helps!
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by:nobus
ID: 22911379
does this show other devices than with the procedure i posted in my 1st post ?
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by:dec0y
ID: 22958579
Yes, it shows a LOT more actually.
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by:nobus
ID: 22958783
the first time i hear this...
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