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Easiest way to move from UNC to DFS?

Posted on 2008-10-30
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
We have a really large file server w/UNC shares on it.  What is the easiest way to setup DFS w/out disrupton to our users?  I was thinking about install DFS on the files server and set it up there but not sure what the best practice is.  We also use login scrips w/UNC paths.  What do you do after DFS is setup to fix the login scripts?  What does a new path look like?  Sorry. I realize DFS has been around forever but we are just not thinking about moving to it.
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Question by:pclark6127
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by:BrandonGalderisi
ID: 22844783
DFS stands for distributed file system.  So you can "HOST" all of your shares on one server, but the files are elsewhere.

So you create a DFS share on your server.  When you add new shared folders, you give them a path and a location.

So if you want the MyShare folder on the MyServer Server to point to \\ABC\DEF, the end result would be that by typing in \\MyServer\MyShare the user would see the files and folders in the \\abc\def folder.

You would simply change the login script to point the existing drive letter to the DFS share that tool the place of the old share.
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by:pclark6127
ID: 22845001
So, if I install the DFS software and setup the pointers in the DFS root I can do this w/out affecting my users and then when I am ready just change the login scripts to point to the new DFS shares?  I don't have to worry about share permissions or anythinng like that do I?   Thanks....
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BrandonGalderisi earned 500 total points
ID: 22845026
I "BELIEVE" that the share permissions are all still handled by the target servers.  So not changing the share permissions is the right thing to do.  I just don't recall whether you need to setup permissions within the DFS.

Regardless, the "cutover" should be as simple as changing your login script to point to the DFS reference instead of the actual share.
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by:Americom
ID: 22845342
NTFS permission still control by the server itself. The only time you would worry about permission is when you do DFS replication that is replicate the same share to a different servers, then the permission will replicate to the other server.

Also, you could use DFS namespace to address share instead of servername. For example, a regular share you have on a server is \\ServeName\Users\ can be accessed by \\DomainName\Users where "Users" is the sharename. This way if you ever move the share from old server to a new server, no need to update your script or shortcuts. With site design and replication, you can have the same data on different servers in different location with the same UNC path and name.
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Author Closing Comment

by:pclark6127
ID: 31511839
I am going to accept Brandons answer as it's specifically fits what I am looking for.  Thanks to the other contributor for the added info.

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