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How to set up OpenOffice as a Windows Servide?

Posted on 2008-10-30
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Last Modified: 2013-12-23
I need to run JODConverter with OpenOffice. The issue is that I tried to install OpenOffice as a Windows service but when trying to run the service installed I always get an error that the system is unable to start the service in a timely fashion.
The following are details about my installation:
Windows 2003 server
OpenOfficePortable version 2.1.4
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Question by:Antonio Cruz
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6 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:oBdA
ID: 22846114
A service has to be programmed as such. If you want to run a regular program as service, you need a wrapper that emulates the service itself and starts/closes the respective program.
SrvAny.exe from the W2k3 Resource Kit is such a wrapper; you can use it in conjunciton with InstSrv.exe to run basically any exe as service.
Check the ResKt documentation for details:
Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit Tools
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=9d467a69-57ff-4ae7-96ee-b18c4790cffd&displaylang=en
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Author Comment

by:Antonio Cruz
ID: 22870632
That behavious was know by myself. The issue is processing as the microsoft tip explains and after to have it installed the service is not working, but if you run openoffice as a standalone application, it is.
That I am looking for is how to install it avoiding those kinds of problems.
My behavior when trying to run OpenOffice as a service is the system is not able of start it up on a timely fashion.
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LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:oBdA
ID: 22870765
Not every program will be capable of running as a srvany-wrapped service. OpenOffice surely wasn't programmed with the intention of having it running as a service. A dialog box opening up (without you being able to see it) or anything else requiring user input may prevent it from working.
You can try to run this srvany instance with a dedicated user account instead of Local System, and/or you can try to run it as a scheduled task during bootup.
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Author Comment

by:Antonio Cruz
ID: 22879433
There are tips in internet saying that OpenOffice can be installed as a service. So, that is not the case.
I just ask for the solutions fixing the problem that I reported
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Accepted Solution

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oBdA earned 125 total points
ID: 22879607
Did you follow the instructions here?
Creating an OpenOffice.org Service on Windows
http://www.artofsolving.com/node/11
The issue probably is, as I mention above, that there's a license agreement (see 7. in the link above) dialog or something similar popping up that you can't see because it's running in the local system / local service context.
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