Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

What are the Pros or Cons of Bonded T1's and Fiber Optic Ethernet?

Posted on 2008-10-31
1
Medium Priority
?
1,237 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-22
We are currently looking at new ISP's and the media and bandwidth they offer.  Two options we are looking at are bonded T1's and Fiber optic ethernet from our local cable company.  The speed (7-10mb) and price are approximately the same per month.  What are the advantages and/or disadvantages to each of these different connections to the internet.
0
Comment
Question by:ohmErnie
1 Comment
 
LVL 22

Accepted Solution

by:
Reid Palmeira earned 2000 total points
ID: 22856245
fiber (typically) is going to be a little more expensive unless you're in a building that is already "on network" for that ISP. That is, they already have fiber into taht building, or that floor of the building and don't have to built fiber to you (which is expensive). It's also generally more reliable than T1's would be. Fiber connectivity should also give you ample headroom for growth/future bandwidth expansion. However, if the building is on-net for the ISP you want to verify the SLA you're getting. Well actually you want to do that with the T1's as well. Say for example the ISP has fiber in the building already with a 1 gbps connection on their network ring. If they sell 100 customers in that building with 10 Mbps each, they've maxed out that gig link. If they sell 200 customers with 10 Mbps (over subscription) they you may get a deal that gives you a committed rate of like 5 Mbps with the capability to "burst" to 10 mbps if there's available bandwidth.

T1 side, bonded T1's are usually leased from the LEC (local exchange carrier, the people who do your local phone service) and are cheaper for the ISP than fiber UNLESS that ISP already has fiber to your building. Bonded T1's mean multiple circuits, which means (on the pro side) some redundancy if one of the loops should fail (each T1 = 1.5 Mbps so 5 T1's = 7.5 Mbps, if you lose one circuit you're down to 6 Mbps) but it also means more expensive equipment. What is the ISP's handoff to you? Are they requiring your router to accept multiple T1's or will they install equipment to handle the T1 bonding and provide you with say an Ethernet connection?

Price either being equal or a lesser factor, opt for the fiber but make sure you clearly understand your Service Level Agreements (SLA's) and what speeds you are being provided at a committed rate and at a max burst rate.
0

Featured Post

Eye-catchers on the conference table

Challenge: The i-unit group was not satisfied with the audio quality during remote meetings. They were looking for a portable solution with excellent audio quality for use in their conference room but also at their client’s offices.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Transferring data across the virtual world became simpler but protecting it is becoming a real security challenge.  How to approach cyber security  in today's business world!
Let’s list some of the technologies that enable smooth teleworking. 
Sending a Secure fax is easy with eFax Corporate (http://www.enterprise.efax.com). First, just open a new email message. In the To field, type your recipient's fax number @efaxsend.com. You can even send a secure international fax — just include t…
Sending a Secure fax is easy with eFax Corporate (http://www.enterprise.efax.com). First, Just open a new email message.  In the To field, type your recipient's fax number @efaxsend.com. You can even send a secure international fax — just include t…
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month13 days, 1 hour left to enroll

972 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question